Magh Bihu

Indian villagers watch two buffaloes lock horns during a traditional buffalo fight during Magh Bihu at Ahotguri, about 80 kilometers (50 miles) east of Gauhati, India. Magh Bihu is the harvest festival of north eastern Assam state and is observed in the Assamese month of Magh, that coincides with January. 
Magh Bihu (also called Bhogali Bihu (Bihu of enjoyment) or Maghar Domahi) is a harvest festival celebrated in Assam, India, which marks the end of harvesting season in the month of Maagha (January–February).  It is the Assam celebration of Sankranthi, with feasting lasting for a week. The festival is marked by feasts and bonfires.  Young people erect makeshift huts, known as meji, from bamboo, leaves and thatch, in which they eat the food prepared for the feast, and then burn the huts the next morning. 
The celebrations also feature traditional Assamese games such as tekeli bhonga (pot-breaking) and buffalo fighting. Magh Bihu celebrations start on the last day of the previous month, the month of “Pooh”, usually the 29th of Pooh and usually the 14th of January, and is the only day of Magh Bihu in modern times (earlier, the festival would last for the whole month of Magh, and so the name Magh Bihu). The night before is “Uruka” (28th of Pooh), when people gather around a bonfire, cook dinner, and make merry.
During Magh Bihu people of Assam make cakes of rice with various names such as Shunga Pitha, Til Pitha etc. and some other sweets of coconut called Laru.
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