Famous Muslim Football Soccer Players

  

Football also Known As Soccer is the most Popular Sports of The World that is played and watched in almost every part of the World from Asia To America and From Africa To Europe. Recently FIFA Football World Cup 2010 also took place in South Africa that was won by the Spain.

Football is also a Popular Sports in many Muslims Countries and their are some good Muslims Football teams and Players as well.  Turkey, Iran, Saudi Arabia has good Football teams and they have also took part in many World Cups.

There are Many Great Muslim Footballers as well that Plays in different Top Teams of the World. Mesut Ozil that is a famous Young German Player is also a Muslim and special thing about him is that he Recites Holy Quran before each match. According to him Reading Holy Quran Before matches gives him more power to play in match well. Following i am going to share the names of Some Famous Muslim Football Players.

1 Nicolas Anelka

He is French Footballer and was converted to Islam in 2004 and his Islamic Name is Bilal.

2 Franck  Ribery

He is a famous French Footballer who also converted to Islam. His Islamic Name is Bilal Ahmed.

3 Zinedine Zidane
Zidane was also a great French Footballer who played Major role in France World Cup win in 1998.

4 Mesut Ozil
He is a Young Germany Footballer who is called next Diego.

5 Kolo Toure
He Plays For Arsenal Football Club and wishes to Become Role Model For British Muslim Youngsters.

6 Frederic Kanoute
He is a French Footballer and a Practicing Muslim.

7 Mehmet Scholl
He was famous Former Germany Football Player.

8 Christian Negouai
He is a French Footballer and a Muslim while having Name Christian.

9 Hakan Şükür
He was Former Great Turkish Football Player.

There are many other great Muslim Football Players as well that are Practicing Muslim but above 9 are my Favourite ones. May Allah Swt Bless all these Players and give them more success.

World’s Best Golfer

 - Luke Donald from England -
Top 2 Pro World’s Best Golfer
Top 3 World’s Best Golfer
- Lee Westwood from England -
Top 4 World’s Best Golfer
- Tiger Woods from USA -

Top 5 World’s Best Golfer

- Webb Simpson from  USA -
Top 6 World’s Best Golfer
- Bubba Watson,  USA -
Top 7 World’s Best Golfer
- Jason Dufner,  USA -
Top 8 World’s Best Golfer
- Matt Kuchar,  USA -
Top 9 World’s Best Golfer
- Justin Rose,  Eng -
-  Hunter Mahan,  USA -

 

Shahid Afridi

      

Full nameSahibzada Mohammad Shahid Khan Afridi
BornMarch 1, 1980, Khyber Agency
Current age 32 years 318 days
Major teams Pakistan, Asia XI, Deccan Chargers, Dhaka Gladiators, Fly Emirates XI, Griqualand West, Habib Bank Limited, Hampshire, ICC World XI, Karachi, Leicestershire, Melbourne Renegades, South Australia
Playing role Allrounder
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Legbreak googly
RelationBrother – Tariq Afridi,Brother – Ashfaq Afridi

Sahibzada Mohammad Shahid Khan Afridi
Batting and fielding averages
Mat Inns NO Runs HS Ave BF SR 100 50 4s 6s Ct St
Tests 27 48 1 1716 156 36.51 1973 86.97 5 8 220 52 10 0
ODIs 349 323 20 7075 124 23.34 6218 113.78 6 33 648 298 112 0
T20Is 58 55 5 845 54* 16.90 591 142.97 0 4 70 32 15 0
First-class 111 183 4 5631 164 31.45 12 30 75 0
List A 440 411 23 9725 124 25.06 8 52 135 0
Twenty20 128 115 10 1944 80 18.51 1265 153.67 0 7 160 91 32 0
Bowling averages
Mat Inns Balls Runs Wkts BBI BBM Ave Econ SR 4w 5w 10
Tests 27 47 3194 1709 48 5/52 5/43 35.60 3.21 66.5 1 1 0
ODIs 349 323 15276 11727 348 6/38 6/38 33.69 4.60 43.8 4 8 0
T20Is 58 58 1301 1371 63 4/11 4/11 21.76 6.32 20.6 3 0 0
First-class 111 13493 7023 258 6/101 27.22 3.12 52.2 8 0
List A 440 19371 14885 452 6/38 6/38 32.93 4.61 42.8 5 10 0
Twenty20 128 128 2800 3015 155 5/20 5/20 19.45 6.46 18.0 4 1 0
Career statistics
Test debut Pakistan v Australia at Karachi, Oct 22-26, 1998 scorecard
Last Test Australia v Pakistan at Lord’s, Jul 13-16, 2010 scorecard
Test statistics - Statsguru Test analysis -Player analysis menu/filterTest match list———————————Batting career summaryBatting innings listHigh scoresBatting series averages———————————Bowling career summaryBowling innings listBowling match listBest innings bowlingBest match bowlingBowling series averages———————————Fielding career summaryFielding innings listMost catches in an inningsFielding series statistics< input type=”submit” name=”submit” class=”button” value=”Submit” style=”vertical-align: middle”>
ODI debut Kenya v Pakistan at Nairobi (Aga), Oct 2, 1996 scorecard
Last ODI Australia v Pakistan at Sharjah, Sep 3, 2012 scorecard
ODI statistics - Statsguru ODI analysis -Player analysis menu/filterODI match list———————————Batting career summaryBatting innings listHigh scoresBatting series averages———————————Bowling career summaryBowling innings listBest innings bowlingBowling series averages———————————Fielding career summaryFielding innings listMost catches in an inningsFielding series statistics< input type=”submit” name=”submit” class=”button” value=”Submit” style=”vertical-align: middle”>
T20I debut England v Pakistan at Bristol, Aug 28, 2006 scorecard
Last T20I India v Pakistan at Ahmedabad, Dec 28, 2012 scorecard
T20I statistics - Statsguru T20I analysis -Player analysis menu/filterT20I match list———————————Batting career summaryBatting innings listHigh scoresBatting series averages———————————Bowling career summaryBowling innings listBest innings bowlingBowling series averages———————————Fielding career summaryFielding innings listMost catches in an inningsFielding series statistics< input type=”submit” name=”submit” class=”button” value=”Submit” style=”vertical-align: middle”>
First-class debut 1995/96
Last First-class Australia v Pakistan at Lord’s, Jul 13-16, 2010 scorecard
List A debut 1995/96
Last List A Australia v Pakistan at Sharjah, Sep 3, 2012 scorecard
Twenty20 debut Kent v Middlesex at Maidstone, Jul 2, 2004 scorecard
Last Twenty20 India v Pakistan at Ahmedabad, Dec 28, 2012 scorecard
Recent matches
Bat & Bowl Team Opposition Ground Match Date Scorecard
0/33, 11 Pakistan v India Ahmedabad 28 Dec 2012 T20I # 298
1/26, 3* Pakistan v India Bangalore 25 Dec 2012 T20I # 296
28, 0/11 PCB Greens v PCB Blues Lahore 20 Dec 2012 Other T20
90, 0/63 PCB Blues v PCB Greens Lahore 19 Dec 2012 Other OD
1/47, 52 PCB Blues v PCB Greens Lahore 17 Dec 2012 Other OD
3, 2/22 K Dolphins v Wolves Lahore 6 Dec 2012 T20
1/17, 19 K Dolphins v L Eagles Lahore 4 Dec 2012 T20
0, 2/16 K Dolphins v Stags Lahore 3 Dec 2012 T20
1/49, 3 K Dolphins v R Rams Lahore 2 Dec 2012 T20
50, 1/22 K Dolphins v P Panthers Lahore 1 Dec 2012 T20
Profile
Of Shahid Afridi it can safely be said that cricket never has and never will see another like him. To say he is an allrounder is to say Albert Einstein was a scientist; it tells a criminally bare story.
  • Read More
Timeline
    • October 4, 1996
      Fitting debut to a kamikaze career
      • In his second ODI, and in his first innings, Shahid Afridi, all of 16 years and 217 days old, marches in with Waqar Younis’ bat in hand, and blasts the reigning world champions for the fastest ever 100 in ODI cricket. His smasha-thon brings up three figures in 37 balls. Its’ not everyday that one ends up with a scoring sequence that reads 0610400600661166264400661411041606024100, leave alone on debut.

    • October 6, 1996
      And he can bowl as well
      • His whirlwind innings had helped Pakistan to the final of the ODI tournament in Nairobi, where they are comprehensively outplayed by South Africa. Still, there is enough time to serve notice about his other skill. Bowling fastish legspin, he picks 3 for 48, as South Africa coast to a win.

    • November 1, 1996
      Pakistan’s Jayasuriya

Wasim Akram وسیم اکرم

Wasim Akram
وسیم اکرم
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Personal information
Full name
Wasim Akram
Born
(1966-06-03) 3 June 1966 (age 46)
Lahore, Punjab, Pakistan
Nickname
WAZ, Sultan of Swing, The Two W’s (with Waqar Younis), King Of Swing
Batting style
Left hand bat
Bowling style
Left arm fast
Role
International information
National side
Test debut (cap 102)
25 January 1984 v New Zealand
Last Test
9 January 2002 v Bangladesh
ODI debut (cap 53)
23 November 1984 v New Zealand
Last ODI
1 March 2003 v India
ODI shirt no.
3
Domestic team information
Years
Team
2003
2000–2001
1997–1998
1992–2002
1988–1998
1986–1987
1985–1986
1984–1986
Career statistics
Competition
Matches
104
356
257
594
Runs scored
2898
3717
7161
6993
22.64
16.52
22.73
18.90
100s/50s
3/7
0/6
7/24
0/17
Top score
257*
86
257*
89*
Balls bowled
22627
18186
50278
29719
414
502
1042
881
23.62
23.52
21.64
21.91
5 wickets in innings
25
6
70
12
10 wickets in match
5
0
16
0
Best bowling
7/119
5/15
8/30
5/10
Catches/stumpings
44/0
88/0
97/0
147/0
Source: ESPNCricinfo, 4 April 2012
Wasim Akram (Punjabi: وسیم اکرم; born 3 June 1966) is a former Pakistani cricketer. He was a genuine left arm fast bowler who can bowl with high pace and left-handed batsman who represented the Pakistan national cricket team in Test cricket and One Day International (ODI) matches.
Akram is regarded as one of the greatest fast bowlers in the history of cricket. He holds the world record for most wickets in List A cricket with 881 and is second only to Sri Lankan off-spin bowler, Muttiah Muralitharan in terms of ODI wickets with 502. He is considered to be one of the founders and perhaps the finest exponent of reverse swing bowling.[1][2][3]
He was the first bowler to reach the 500-wicket mark in ODI cricket during the 2003 World Cup. In 2002 Wisden released its only list of best players of all time. Wasim was ranked as the best bowler in ODI of all time with a rating of 1223.5, ahead of Allan Donald, Imran Khan, Waqar Younis, Joel Garner, Glen McGrath and Muralitharan.[4] Wasim has taken 23 4-wicket hauls in ODI in 356 matches he played.[1] On 30 September 2009, Akram was one of five new members inducted into the ICC Cricket Hall of Fame.[5][6] He is the current bowling coach of Kolkata Knight Riders.[7]
Early and personal life
Akram was born in Pakistan on 3 June 1966.[citation needed] He was educated at Islamia College in Lahore, where he played as an opening bowler and batsman.[8] Like several other Pakistani cricketers during the 1980s, his inclusion into the national side was at the behest of a senior player in the team, which in Akram’s case, was Javed Miandad.[9]
At the age of 30, Akram was diagnosed with diabetes. “I remember what a shock it was because I was a healthy sportsman with no history of diabetes in my family, so I didn’t expect it at all. It seemed strange that it happened to me when I was 30, but it was a very stressful time and doctors said that can trigger it.”[10] Since then he has actively sought to be involved in various awareness campaigns for diabetes.[11]
Akram married Huma in 1995.[12] They had two sons Tahmoor (1996) and Akbar (2000)[13] from their marriage of fifteen years. Huma died of multiple organ failure at Apollo Hospital in Chennai, India on 25 October 2009.[14]
International career
First-class cricket
In 1988 Akram signed for Lancashire County Cricket Club in England. From 1988 to 1998, he opened their bowling attack in their ECB Trophy, Benson and Hedges Cup and National League tournaments. He was a favorite of the local British fans who used to sing a song called “Wasim for England” at Lancashire’s matches. In 1998, with Akram as captain, Lancashire won the ECB Trophy and Axa League and finished second in the championship tournament despite losing only five matches in all competitions throughout the season. Apart from the National League second division title in 2003, this was the last time Lancashire won a trophy.[15]
Test cricket
Akram made his Test cricket debut for Pakistan against New Zealand in 1985[16] and in his second Test match, he claimed 10 wickets.[17] A few weeks prior to his selection into the Pakistan team, he was an unknown club cricketer who had failed to make it even to his college team. He came to the trials at Gaddafi Stadium in Lahore in Pakistan, but for the first two days he did not get a chance to bowl. On the third day he got a chance; his performance convincing Javed Miandad to insist upon his inclusion in the national team.[9] Akram was hence given an opportunity to play for Pakistan, without any significant domestic experience.
Akram’s rise in international cricket was rapid during the late 1980s. When Pakistan toured the West Indies in 1988, he looked to be the fastest bowler between the two sides. However, a groin injury impeded his career in the late 1980s. Following two surgeries, he re-emerged in the 1990s as a fast bowler who focused more on swing and accurate bowling.[18]
One Day International
Akram started his ODI career against New Zealand in Pakistan in 1984 under the captaincy of Zaheer Abbass.[19] He rose to prominence taking five wickets in his 3rd ODI against Australia in the 1985 Benson & Hedges World Championship. His wickets included those of Kepler Wessels, Dean Jones and captain Allan Border.[20]
1983–91
In the 1984–85 Rothmans Four-Nations Cup and the 1985–86 Rothmans Sharjah Cup he took five wickets with a run rate of under 3.50. The 1985–1986 Austral-Asia Cup involved Australia, India, New Zealand, Pakistan and Sri Lanka, and was played in UAE Sharjah. Akram, with the help of Abdul Qadir, bowled out New Zealand’s batting line up for 64 in the second semi final of cup. Pakistan won that game with more than 27 overs to spare obtaining one of the biggest wins in Pakistani history. In the final against India he and Imran shared five wickets. Akram’s wickets included Dilip Vengsarkar and Ravi Shastri.
In the 1987 Reliance World Cup held for the 1st time in the sub-continent, Akram struggled on Pakistani pitches where he managed only 7 wickets with an average of over 40 in 7 matches. Akram played West Indies, Sri Lanka and England twice. All group matches were played in Pakistan.
In the 1988–89 Benson and Hedges World Series he managed figures of 4–25 against Australia.[21] He took his hundredth wicket at Sharjah in 1989–1990 Champions Trophy – 2nd Match against West Indies. His 100th wicket was of Ambrose. In that match he took a five-wickets haul for the second time in his career.[22] In the same match he took his first hat-trick against West Indies. All three batsman were bowled.[22][23][24] On 4 May 1990 in Sharjah, Akram took his second ODI hat-trick against |Australia. All three batsmen were bowled this time also.[23][25]
His best years in late 1980s were from 1986–1989 when which he took 100 wickets at 22.71 apiece and economy rate of less than 3.9 run/over with four 4-wicket hauls. His first two hauls against Sri Lanka and Bangladesh came in Sri Lanka in 1986.[26]
Up to December 1991 Akram took 143 wickets in 107 matches with an average of almost 24 and economy rate of 3.84.[18]
1992–97
Akram was a significant figure in the 1992 Cricket World Cup held in Australia, when Pakistan won the tournament. In the final against England, his batting performance during his innings of 33 runs off 19 balls, pushed Pakistan to a score of 249 runs for 6 wickets. Akram then took the wicket of Ian Botham early on the English batting innings and when brought back into the bowling attack later on, with the ball reverse swinging, he produced a spell of bowling which led to Allan Lamb and Chris Lewis being bowled in successive deliveries in one over. His performances earned him the Man of the Match award for the final.[27][28] In 1993 Akram took 2 consecutive 4-wicket hauls against Sri Lanka in Sharjah in which 7 out of 8 wickets were either LBW or bowled.[29]
In the 1992–1993 Total International Series in South Africa (involving Pakistan, West Indies and South Africa) he took 5 wickets against South Africa and got his 200th wicket in his 143rd match.[30][31][32] Akram took 46 wickets in calendar year 1993, his best year ever in ODI. His average which was less than 19 with an economy rate of less than 3.8 runs per over. He took six 4-wicket hauls in 1993, the most by him in any year.[32] In the 1996 World Cup he missed the quarter final match against India which Pakistan lost and went out of the World Cup. Between 1994 and 1996 he took 84 wickets in 39 matches.[32]
From January 1992 to December 1997 Akram played 131 matches took 198 wickets at an average of 21.86 with 14 4-wicket hauls in ODIs.[18]
1998 to the 2003 World Cup
In 1999, he led Pakistan to the brink of victory in the World Cup before they capitulated and was defeated by Australia in the final, by eight wickets with almost 30 overs to spare.[33] This was the start of the match fixing controversies, as critics believed Akram had set up the match for Australia. However, none of the allegations could be proved.[34][35]
He was Pakistan’s best bowler in the 2003 Cricket World Cup taking 12 wickets in 6 matches.[36] However, Pakistan failed to reach the super six of the tournament and Akram was one of the eight players to be sacked by the Pakistan Cricket Board as a result.[37][38]
Records
Akram won 17 Man-of-the-Match awards in 104 tests. He took 4 hat-tricks in International cricket – two in ODIs.[22][25] and two in Tests,[39][40] He finished with 22 Man-of-the-Match awards in ODIs. In 199 ODI match wins, he took 326 wickets at under 19 apiece with a run rate of 3.70 and took 18 four-wicket hauls.[18] His 257 not-out against Zimbabwe in 1996 is the highest innings by a number 8 batsman in tests. He hit 12 sixes in that, most by anyone in a test innings.[41]
Prior to his retirement, he was one of eight senior players dropped for the Sharjah Cup in April 2003, and was then omitted from the Pakistan squad for the subsequent Bank Alfalah Cup triangular series.[42] Due to his omission from the team, he did not participate in a farewell match. Akram fulfilled his contract play for Hampshire until the end of the English season.[43]
Post retirement
Media career
Since retiring from cricket, Akram has worked and taken up commentary for television networks and can currently be seen as a sports commentator for ESPN Star Sports and ARY Digital among others. He did commentary on a variety of sporting tournaments including the 2009 Women’s Cricket World Cup in Australia, the 2009 ICC World Twenty20 in England, the 2009 ICC Champions Trophy in South Africa, and the 2011 ICC World Cup in India, Sri Lanka and Bangladesh.
Coaching career
In 2010, Akram was appointed the bowling coach consultant of Kolkata Knight Riders, the Indian Premier League team for Kolkata. Sourav Ganguly was always keen to have Akram as the bowling coach for India, during the former’s stint as Indian captain. Although this never happened, his dreams were realised to some extent, when Akram was appointed as the bowling coach for the franchise.[44] While working for the Kolkata Knight Riders, he was also responsible for the signing of Pakistani domestic left-arm fast-bowler Mohammad Irfan.[45] Akram has also been coaching in Pakistan fast bowling camps, his most notable discovery being the teenage Pakistani bowler Muhammad Amir.
Legacy
Over my 15 or 16 years of playing international cricket in Tests and One Day Internationals, Wasim Akram is definitely the most outstanding bowler I’ve ever faced.
— Former West Indies batsman Brian Lara.[46]
During his professional career he bowled with genuine speed and hostility. Akram was a man possessed of accurate control of line and length, accompanied by seam and swing bowling skills, extended to both inswingers and outswingers. With a very quick bowling action, he could bowl equally well from both sides of the wicket. His mastery of reverse swing with the cricket ball meant he was at his most dangerous towards a bowling innings, and earned him the nickname of one of the “Sultans of Swing”, the other one being Waqar Younis.
As well as often being able to find the edge of the bat, Akram would also focus his bowling attack on the stumps and had a particularly lethal inswinging yorker. Of his 414 Test wickets, 193 were taken caught, 119 were taken leg before wicket and 102 were bowled.[47][48][49] In partnership with Waqar Younis, he intimidated international batsmen in the 1990s. Together Wasim and Waqar, known as “the two Ws” of the Pakistani team, were one of the most successful bowling partnerships in cricket.[50]
Akram was also skilled with the bat and was regarded as a bowling all-rounder. He was especially effective against spin bowlers. However, he liked to slog and was criticised for his lack of high scores and giving away his wicket too cheaply for a player of his talent. He did silence his critics and the media in October 1996 when he scored 257 runs not out, of the team’s total of 553 against Zimbabwe at Sheikhupura. He also achieved good scores for the Pakistan team such as his scores of 123 and 45* against Australia to take Pakistan to victory in a low scoring match. His batting was also valuable to the Pakistan ODI side, such as his match winning performance in the Nehru Cup, when needing six runs and two balls to win the match; he hit the first delivery he faced for six runs and secured the cup.
In December 2012 after Ricky Ponting announced his retirement he admitted that Wasim Akram along with Curtly Ambrose were the toughest bowlers he had faced [51] “Akram for the exact opposite, you could get a few runs off him, but you just knew there was an unplayable ball around the corner, be it with an old ball or with a new ball,” – Ricky Ponting [52]
Modeling
Akram walked the ramp at the Pantene Bridal Couture Week 2011 which was an event of Style 360.[53][54]
Award and records
Akram was awarded Wisden Cricketer of the Year in 1993 for his sporting achievements. He was awarded Lux Style Award for Most Stylish Sports Person in 2003.
  • In his Test career, Akram took 414 wickets in 104 matches, a Pakistani record, at an average of 23.62 and scored 2,898 runs, at an average of 22.64.[55]
  • In One Day Internationals, Akram took 502 wickets in 356 appearances, at an average of 23.52 and scored 3,717 runs, at an average of 16.52.[2]
  • Akram was the first bowler in international cricket to take more than 400 wickets in both forms of the game and only Muttiah Muralitharan has since achieved this.[2][55]
  • Akram also held the record for the most wickets in Cricket World Cups, a total of 55 in 38 matches. Australia‘s Glenn McGrath broke the record during the 2007 Cricket World Cup, ending with a final tally of 71 from 39 matches.[56] On passing Wasim’s record, McGrath said, “Wasim Akram, to me, is one of the greatest bowlers of all time. Left-armer, swung it both ways with the new ball and he was so dangerous with the old ball. To go past him is something I will always remember. Probably the other side of the coin is that if you play long enough, you’re going to break records here and there.”[57]
  • Akram took four hat-tricks in international cricket, two each in Tests matches and One Day Internationals. He is the only bowler in cricket to have achieved four hat-tricks. He was the third of only three bowlers to have taken two Test cricket hat-tricks, the others being Hugh Trumble and Jimmy Matthews. Akram was also the first of only five bowlers to have taken two One Day International cricket hat-tricks. Akram’s Test hat-tricks are significant, since they were taken in consecutive Test matches in the same series, a game played against Sri Lanka in the 1998-99 Asian Test Championship. Akram is also one of only two bowlers to have taken both a Test match and One Day International hat-trick, the other being Pakistan fast bowler, Mohammad Sami.[58][59]
  • Playing in a Test series against the West Indies at Lahore in 1990–1991, he became one of only six players to have taken four wickets in an over during a Test match. In Akram’s case, these achievement was not part of a hat-trick, the third ball he delivered to the batting opposition was a dropped catch, which allowed a single run.[60][61]
  • Akram has also achieved the highest score by a number eight batsman in Test cricket when he scored 257 runs not out from 363 balls against Zimbabwe at Sheikhupura. The innings contained 12 sixes which is also a world record for Test cricket.[62][63]
  • He also has the third highest number of Man of the Match awards in Test cricket, with seventeen.[64]
  • He has scored the record number of runs in One Day International matches by a player who has never scored a One Day International hundred. His highest score was 86 runs.[65]
Cricket controversies
In 1992, after he had been successful against the English batsmen, accusations of ball tampering began to appear in the English media, though no video evidence of foul play was ever found. Akram and Younis had been able to obtain prodigious amounts of movement from both new and old cricket balls. The skill of the reverse swing delivery was relatively unknown in England and around the cricketing world during that period.
A far larger controversy was created when critics alleged that he was involved in match fixing. An inquiry commission was set up by the Pakistan Cricket Board headed by a Pakistan high court judge, Malik Mohammad Qayyum. The judge wrote in his report that:[66]
This commission feels that all is not well here and that Wasim Akram is not above board. He has not co-operated with this Commission. It is only by giving Wasim Akram the benefit of the doubt after Ata-ur-Rehman changed his testimony in suspicious circumstances that he has not been found guilty of match-fixing. He cannot be said to be above suspicion

Great Javed Miandad جاوید میانداد

Javed Miandad
Personal information
Full name
Mohammad Javed Miandad
Born
(1957-06-12) 12 June 1957 (age 55)
Karachi, Sindh, Pakistan
Batting style
Bowling style
Role
Batsman
International information
National side
Test debut
9 October 1976 v New Zealand
Last Test
16 December 1993 v Zimbabwe
ODI debut
11 June 1975 v West Indies
Last ODI
8 march 1996 v India
Domestic team information
Years
Team
1975–1991
1980–1985
1976–1979
Career statistics
Competition
Matches
124
233
402
439
Runs scored
8,832
7,381
28,663
13,973
52.57
41.70
53.37
42.60
100s/50s
23/43
8/50
80/139
13/101
Top score
280*
119*
311
152*
Balls bowled
1,470
297
12,690
830
17
7
191
18
40.11
42.42
34.06
34.05
5 wickets in innings
6
10 wickets in match
n/a
n/a
n/a
Best bowling
3/74
2/22
7/39
3/20
Catches/stumpings
93/1
71/2
341/3
142/2
Source: ESPNcricinfo, 10 March 2009
Mohammad Javed Miandad (Urdu: محمد جاوید میانداد) (born 12 June 1957), popularly known as Javed Miandad (Urdu: جاوید میانداد), is a former Pakistani cricketer who played between 1975 and 1996. He is Pakistan’s leading run scorer in Test cricket. ESPNcricinfo described him that he is “the greatest batsman Pakistan has ever produced”.[1] He has served as a captain of the Pakistan national cricket team. He is widely known for – his historic last ball big sixer against India in 1986, when 4 runs were required to win – winning an international game in that fashion for the first time.[2] After his playing career, he has remained the coach of Pakistan cricket team at various occasions, as well as held positions in the Pakistan Cricket Board. He had three coaching stints with the Pakistan national team.[3]
Early life
Javed Miandad was born on 12 June 1957 in Karachi.[4] His parents moved from Palanpur, Gujarat, India.[citation needed] Javed Miandad is a Tyagi (Muslim).[5] Cricket was his family game.[4] He had three brothers play first-class cricket in Pakistan: Anwar Miandad, Sohail Miandad and Bashir Miandad.[6][7][8] His nephew, Faisal Iqbal, is also a Test cricketer.[9]
International career
Test career
Miandad made his Test debut against New Zealand at Gaddafi Stadium, Lahore on 9 October 1976. He scored 163 in this match, to become the youngest player at the time to do so at an age of 19 years and 119 days.[10] In the same series he scored a double century, and on his way broke George Headley‘s 47 year record, to become the youngest player to achieve the feat.[11]
Pakistan first Test captain, Abdul Hafeez Kardar, when saw the young batsman during 70s, famously predicted Miandad “the find of the decade”.[1] His inclusion in the Pakistan team was itself an achievement. A formidable batting line-up of Majid Khan, Sadiq Muhammad, Zaheer Abbas, Asif Iqbal, Mushtaq Muhammad and Wasim Raja was hard to create any replacements, but Miandad’s raw talent made it possible and he become an integral part of Pakistan’s strong batting line.
Javed Miandad played 124 Test matches, batting in 189 innings. His aggregate of 8,832 Test runs is a Pakistani record. Even though his test career spanned 17 years, he failed to make it into the top-most category of batsmen with test aggregates of over 10,000 runs.[1][12] Miandad’s 23 centuries and 43 fifties were Pakistani national records, until they were broken by Inzamam-ul-Haq. Miandad’s Test career batting average of 52.57 is among the highest for Pakistani batsmen. He scored six double centuries which is the most by a Pakistani and 6th overall. He has honour of scoring centuries in both innings in the 100th test match against New Zealand.[13] He made his highest score of 280 not out against India.Pakistan went on to win that match by an innings and 119 runs.[14]
Miandad scored a Test century in his first match against India at the Iqbal Stadium, Faisalabad, in 1978.[15] With 154 not out in the match, he completed his first 1,000 Test runs at the age of 21 years and 126 days.[16] This was his 23rd innings and 14th match. He scored 2,000 Test runs in 42 innings for which he took 24 matches. He also scored centuries in the each innings of a Test match, 104 and 103 not out, against New Zealand at the Niaz Stadium, Hyderabad, in November 1984.[17] He scored six double centuries which are the most by a Pakistan batsman.[16]
In 1992, during the Pakistan tour to England, he scored 153 not out in the first Test at Edgbaston, Birmingham.[18] Since then to his retirement he scored 578 runs, without scoring a century, at the average of 32.11 in 11 Tests. He made only four half-centuries during that period.[19]
One Day International Career
Miandad made his One Day International debut against the West Indies at Edgbaston, Birmingham in the 1975 Cricket World Cup . Interestingly, his last ODI was also a world cup match, and Pakistan lost the match. More, he scored 2 fours and 0 sixes and his strike rate was below 100 in both of his, first and last ODI innings.[20][21] His highest ODI score came against India at the Gaddafi Stadium in a match which Pakistan lost in 1982. He scored 119 not out off 77 balls with a strike rate of 154.54 in the match.[3][22]
Miandad is famously known for last ball six against India during the final of 1986 Austral-Asia Cup. In a great finale, the last over bowled by Chetan Sharma began with 11 runs required. Two wickets fell during the over with Pakistan needing 4 runs and India one wicket from the last ball. Miandad hit the ball, low full-toss from Sharma, for a six into the crowd.[23] Pakistan recorded their first win at a major tournament and Miandad finished his innings with 116 not out.[24][25] This is still considered as one of the most historic moments in the history of ODI cricket and he became a national hero.[3][26][27]
Javed Miandad is the first (and one of the only two, other being Sachin Tendulkar) player to have played in six World Cups, the first six, from 1975 to 1996.
Captaincy
After the retirement of Asif Iqbal following a loss of a series to India, 22 years old Miandad was made the captain of Pakistan.[28] The Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB) preferred him over the senior cricketers like Zaheer Abbas, Sarfraz Nawaz, Majid Khan and Wasim Bari who were still playing. He faced a little opposition but his first two series as captain, in 1981/82, included a win against Australia, and a credible 0-1 loss to the West Indies.[29][30] After a tough tour of Australia, oppostion to his captaincy gained strength, and his first captaincy period ended during the following home series against Sri Lanka.[31][32]
Coaching and commentary
As a coach, Javed Miandad guided Pakistan to test victories in the Asian Test Championship and in India during 1998-99 season, when Wasim Akram was captain. Miandad also later assisted with coaching Pakistani batsmen.[33]
Following this he was offered broadcasting and coaching positions in India.[34] Also in November 2010 it was being planned to give Miandad a role as a batting coach.[35] Miandad was again appointed as a batting consultant for the 2012 twenty20 World Cup in SriLanka
Personal life
Javed Miandad married Tahira Saigol in 1980. He has two sons and a daughter.[citation needed] His son Junaid Miandad is married to Mahrukh Ibrahim, daughter of Dawood Ibrahim, an Indian born underworld kingpin who currently resides in Dubai. Miandad told the press that his son and Ibrahim’s daughter met while studying together in the UK.[36] In 2011, Miandad recorded Naat for Geo TV; his “Sakoon Paya” was well received by his fans but he did not subsequently read any more Naat.[37]
Records & achievements
Pride of Performance Award Recipient
Presented by
Date
1986
Country
Islamic Republic of Pakistan
  • Miandad was amongst the three Pakistani players to have his name in the Hall of Fame at Lords.[38][39][40]
  • In 1986, he had received the President’s Pride of Performance Award.[41]
  • Miandad is one of two cricketers (the other is Sachin Tendulkar) to appear in Six World Cup competitions.[42]
  • In 1982, Wisden named him as one of the cricketers of the year.[4]
  • Javed Miandad scored 1083 runs in 33 matches at 6 World Cup tournaments.[42]
  • He was also declared the 44th best Cricketer of all time in ESPN Legend Of Cricket.
  • He is the youngest player to hit a double-century. He broke George Headley’s 47-year-old record. Now the record is 35 years old[43]
  • Miandad holds the world record for the maximum number of consecutive half centuries in One Day Internationals- 9[44]
Performance
Test performance by opponent
Javed Miandad’s performance in Test matches[1][45]
Opponent
Matches
HS
025 !25
040 !40
0021 !2
01797 !1797
0211 !211
04728 !47.28
006 !6
007 !7
012 !1
1
022 !22
032 !32
006 !6
01329 !1329
0260 !260
05111 !51.11
0021 !1
009 !9
020 !20
-006 !
028 !28
039 !39
006 !6
02228 !2228
0280 !280*
06751 !67.51
005 !5
014 !14
018 !18
-005 !
018 !18
029 !29
005 !5
01919 !1919
0169 !169
05225 !52.25
007 !7
006 !6
020 !20
-004 !
012 !12
016 !16
002 !2
00582 !882
0203 !203*
04157 !41.57
001 !1
002 !2
011 !11
-003 !
016 !16
028 !28
0002 !0
00834 !834
0114 !114
02978 !29.78
001 !1
002 !2
011 !11
-002 !
003 !3
005 !5
0000 !0
00143 !143
0070 !70
02860 !28.60
0000 !0
001 !1
000 !0
-001 !
00000 !Total
0124 !124
0189 !189
021 !21
08832 !8832
0280 !280*
05257 !52.57
023 !23
043 !43
093 !93
001 !1
ODI Performance by Opponent
Miandad’s performance in ODI matches[1][46]
Opponent
Matches
HS
035 !35
033 !33
0033 !3
01019 !1019
0074 !74*
03396 !33.96
0004 !0
007 !0
010 !10
0011 !1
0012 !1
0001 !0
-009 !
00015 !15
0015 !15
01500 !15.00
0004 !0
0003 !0
0003 !0
-009 !
0011 !1
0002 !1
0003 !0
-009 !
-009 !
-009 !
-009 !
-009 !
0002 !0
-008 !
027 !27
027 !27
006 !6
00991 !991
0113 !113
04719 !47.19
0004 !1
010 !10
012 !12
-007 !
035 !35
034 !34
011 !11
01175 !1175
0119 !119*
05108 !51.08
003 !3
006 !6
013 !13
-006 !
001 !1
0000 !0
-005 !
-005 !
-005 !
-005 !
-005 !
-005 !
0001 !0
-005 !
024 !24
020 !20
003 !3
00702 !702
0090 !90*
04129 !41.29
0001 !0
004 !4
006 !6
-004 !
003 !3
003 !3
0000 !0
00145 !145
0107 !107
04833 !48.33
0011 !1
0003 !0
001 !12
-003 !
035 !35
031 !31
010 !10
01141 !1141
0115 !115*
05433 !54.33
002 !2
008 !8
012 !12
-002 !
001 !1
0000 !0
-001 !
-001 !
-001 !
-001 !
-001 !
-001 !
001 !0
-001 !
064 !64
064 !64
007 !7
01930 !1930
0100 !100*
03385 !33.85
001 !1
012 !12
014 !14
001 !1
006 !6
005 !5
001 !1
00263 !263
0089 !89
06575 !65.75
000 !0
003 !3
002 !2
-0001 !
00000 !Total
233 !233
0228 !228
041 !42
07381 !7381
0119 !119*
04170 !41.70
008 !8
050 !50
071 !71
002 !2
Performance Graph
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/43/Javed_Miandad_Graph.png/650px-Javed_Miandad_Graph.png
http://bits.wikimedia.org/static-1.21wmf7/skins/common/images/magnify-clip.png
Javed Miandad’s career performance graph.
 

Javed Miandad

  

Full nameMohammad Javed Miandad Khan
BornJune 12, 1957, Karachi, Sind
Current age 55 years 215 days
Major teams Pakistan, Glamorgan, Habib Bank Limited, Karachi, Sind, Sussex
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Legbreak googly
RelationBrother – Bashir Miandad,Brother – Anwar Miandad,Brother – Sohail Miandad,Nephew – Faisal Iqbal

Mohammad Javed Miandad Khan
Batting and fielding averages
Mat Inns NO Runs HS Ave BF SR 100 50 6s Ct St
Tests 124 189 21 8832 280* 52.57 23 43 48 93 1
ODIs 233 218 41 7381 119* 41.70 11014 67.01 8 50 71 2
First-class 402 632 95 28663 311 53.37 80 139 340 3
List A 439 407 79 13973 152* 42.60 13 101 144 2
Bowling averages
Mat Inns Balls Runs Wkts BBI BBM Ave Econ SR 4w 5w 10
Tests 124 36 1470 682 17 3/74 5/94 40.11 2.78 86.4 0 0 0
ODIs 233 12 436 297 7 2/22 2/22 42.42 4.08 62.2 0 0 0
First-class 402 12688 6507 191 7/39 34.06 3.07 66.4 6 0
List A 439 830 613 18 3/20 3/20 34.05 4.43 46.1 0 0 0
Career statistics
Test debut Pakistan v New Zealand at Lahore, Oct 9-13, 1976 scorecard
Last Test Pakistan v Zimbabwe at Lahore, Dec 16-21, 1993 scorecard
Test statistics - Statsguru Test analysis -Player analysis menu/filterTest match list———————————Batting career summaryBatting innings listHigh scoresBatting series averages———————————Bowling career summaryBowling innings listBowling match listBest innings bowlingBest match bowlingBowling series averages———————————Fielding career summaryFielding innings listMost dismissals in an inningsFielding series statistics< input type=”submit” name=”submit” class=”button” value=”Submit” style=”vertical-align: middle”>
ODI debut Pakistan v West Indies at Birmingham, Jun 11, 1975 scorecard
Last ODI India v Pakistan at Bangalore, Mar 9, 1996 scorecard
ODI statistics - Statsguru ODI analysis -Player analysis menu/filterODI match list———————————Batting career summaryBatting innings listHigh scoresBatting series averages———————————Bowling career summaryBowling innings listBest innings bowlingBowling series averages———————————Fielding career summaryFielding innings listMost dismissals in an inningsFielding series statistics< input type=”submit” name=”submit” class=”button” value=”Submit” style=”vertical-align: middle”>
First-class span 1973-1994
List A span 1975-1998
Recent matches
Bat & Bowl Team Opposition Ground Match Date Scorecard
0 Pakistan Snr v India Snrs Lahore 30 Apr 2006 Other OD
15 Pakistan Snr v India Snrs Sheikhupura 27 Apr 2006 Other OD
16* Pakistan Snr v India Snrs Karachi 23 Apr 2006 Other OD
Profile
Javed Miandad is the greatest batsman Pakistan has ever produced. There was little doubt in the mind of Abdul Hafeez Kardar, Pakistan’s first Test captain and influential administrator, when he first laid eyes on him as a youngster in the early 70s and famously predicted Miandad “the find of the decade.” He wasn’t wrong, as a stupendous debut series against New Zealand in 1976 started to prove. 

Top 100 Football Players of All-Time

 

Two years ago, I put together the 50 best players in history for each of the four major sports. That was a daunting and time consuming task but I was fairly happy with the results. As time moved along, it started to bother me more and more that I didn’t have a “top 100” so I’ve spent the last six months or so working on that. For the most part, the players rated in my original “top 50″ stayed in the same spots with a few exceptions. There was limited player movement that mostly involved active players. Also, there were a few instances where a player moved into the top 50 who was previously left out two years ago.

Please read the following before moving on to the list…

1). It is important to know why and how I chose to rate active players. A list like this isn’t nearly as fun or accurate if we just pretend active players don’t exist. The way I rated active players is simple. I considered their accomplishments up to this point and then assumed a healthy, reasonable, finish to their careers.

2). None of the rankings are arbitrary or without multiple rationalizations. If you would like a clarification, feel free to ask. I’d be happy to rationalize a ranking. If I agree with an objection, then I’ll be happy to make a change.

3). It is not uncommon for sports fans to discount current players with respect to history because a). present-day players don’t have the luxury of accumulating gaudy statistics and award-counts against weak competition and b). their most cherished memories are from childhood so there is an inherent preference towards players from earlier generations. I can understand why the overrating occurs but, at the same time, I’m not going to do it here.

4). These lists are based on the NBA, NHL, MLB, and NFL. I would love to have the insight to include players from international leagues. The same goes for the Negro Leagues. Instead of pretending to know more than I do, I only chose to rate players who did their work in the four major leagues.

5). The list is based on statistics through December ’07.

6). First and last names for each player have different links. First names link to Wikipedia-entries and last names link to career-stats.

7). For more information, click here. It’s my criterion from the original “Top 50.” It’s basically the same with more boring detail.

Top 100 Football Players of All-Time

1) Jerry Rice

I have never seen a list that rated Jerry Rice as the best football player in NFL history. Likewise, I have never seen a list that didn’t rate Jim Brown the best player in NFL history. I get the impression that everyone rates Jim Brown first just because everyone else does. Heck, I had him first when I started just because I had been taught to believe that he was the best. The only problem with that thinking is that Jerry Rice is the best player of all-time in terms of production, longevity, and career accomplishments and it’s not very close. Brown might win on perception but Rice wins every other comparison. Even if someone wanted to argue that Brown’s statistics are as equally impressive as Rice’s, there’s the fact that Rice played for 20 seasons. That is more than double Brown’s nine. Just to give a proper indication of how dominating Rice was throughout his career, consider his lead in the record-books. The difference between Rice and Chris Carter (second on the receptions list) is 448 receptions. That is as big as the difference between Carter and the #32 player on the list (Ozzie Newsome). The difference between Rice and Tim Brown (second on the receiving yardage list) is 8,000 yards. The difference between Brown and the 50th player on the list (Paul Warfield) is only 6,000. The difference between Rice and Carter (second all-time in receiving touchdowns) is the same as the difference between Carter and the 50th player on the list. Those are just receiving statistics. Rice’s dominance goes beyond receivers. Rice has 32 more touchdowns than any WR or RB in NFL history. He has 2,000 more total yards than any other WR or RB in NFL history. He also holds all of the major playoff and Super Bowl records by a receiver. His dominance in individual statistics is second to none and it’s not even close. If team success is your preference, Rice paced the San Francisco 49ers to three Super Bowl victories. He was the Super Bowl MVP in 1988, the NFL Offensive Player of the Year in ’87 and ’93, and the MVP (PFWA) in ’87. The number of truly great wide receivers in NFL history is nowhere near the number of great running backs, quarterbacks, and offensive lineman. No player in NFL history dominated his position more astonishingly. The difference between Rice and the second best WR of all-time is vastly more definitive than the difference between the top two players at any other position. If people don’t feel “comfortable” putting someone other than Brown at number one, then there’s probably not much that I can say to change their mind. But, there isn’t any doubt in my mind that Rice should be number one on this list.

2) Jim Brown

After writing that much on Jerry Rice, I almost feel like I just spent 20 minutes bashing Jim Brown. I assure you–that was not my intention. Brown had a phenomenal career—albeit a short one. He shocked the NFL by retiring in his prime after only nine seasons. Brown dominated the NFL with his superior speed and size. Brown retired holding virtually all of the rushing records for yardage and touchdowns. Brown was the NFL’s MVP three times (two AP, and one UPI). There are other players that could be put in the second spot ahead of Brown based on career length but Brown was just so much better than anyone when he played that he gets the nod.

3) Lawrence Taylor

One thing that I tried to focus on in compiling this list was to give proper credit to all positions on both sides of the ball. Quarterbacks and running backs often receive the bulk of the glory which takes away from the best players at other positions. Is there any reason to believe that the best defensive lineman of all-time has to be worse than the best quarterback of all-time? I think NFL fans have been brainwashed to think along those lines. Despite my best efforts, I still managed to include a larger percentage of running backs and quarterbacks on the list than other positions but it wasn’t due to a lack of effort. It is entirely possible that Lawrence Taylor was the best player to ever play the game. Unfortunately, there is no way to tell. “LT” is the only player in NFL history to win three NFL Defensive Player of the Year awards. He is also one of only four players to win the NFL MVP award as a defensive player. Taylor was the most dominating pass-rusher in NFL history. He was fast and ferocious. He completely changed the opposition’s blocking schemes because it was nearly impossible to block him one on one. His dominance on defense helped lead the New York Giants to two Super Bowl titles despite having less-than-stellar offenses.

4) Joe Montana

Was Joe Montana’s legacy inflated because of his good fortune of playing with Jerry Rice? Probably. But, it can be equally said that Rice’s legacy was somewhat inflated by his good fortune of playing with a quarterback as brilliant as Montana. A common criticism of Montana is the fact that a) he played in a system designed to put up big numbers and b) had supremely talented teammates. There is no question that both of those are true. But when has a well designed system and talented teammates ever guaranteed success, let alone four Super Bowl rings and the highest quarterback rating in NFL history when he retired? Also, it’s important to note that although Montana’s teams were talented, they weren’t that talented. The 49ers won because of Montana and Rice. The rest of the team was nowhere near as talented as Terry Bradshaw’s Pittsburgh Steelers, Bart Starr’s Green Bay Packers or Troy Aikman’s Dallas Cowboys. Montana led the 49ers to four Super Bowl wins in which he was named the Super Bowl MVP a record three times. He was also named the NFL MVP twice. There have been many great QB’s in the NFL but none can match Montana’s combination of efficiency, production, and success.

5) Johnny Unitas

Before Joe Montana came along, Johnny Unitas was usually the answer to the question, “who is the greatest QB of all-time?” Arguments can be made for other great QB’s like Sammy Baugh and Otto Graham but Unitas was probably the most common answer. Unitas was the first quarterback to throw for 40,000 yards in a career. He won three NFL MVP awards and led the Baltimore Colts franchise to two NFL Championships. Unitas was also one of the most influential quarterbacks in NFL history. I don’t think it’s a coincidence that league-wide passing took off after his arrival to the NFL.

6) Reggie White

I think it’s possible that Reggie White is the best defensive lineman of all-time. I suspect his greatness will be remembered more fondly with each passing year. His career statistics are just mind-boggling. He is second on the all-time sack list just two behind Bruce Smith. He made 13 Pro Bowls which is the second most of any player on the list (Merlin Olsen). He won two NFL Defensive Player of the Year awards. He is the franchise leader in sacks for two different organizations. He also led the Green Bay Packers to a Super Bowl victory.

7) Emmitt Smith

For me, Emmitt Smith is like a fine wine. I grow fonder and fonder of his abilities as the years pass. When he was in his prime, I constantly rationalized why Barry Sanders was the better back. As a Detroit-fan, the last thing I wanted to do was admit that Emmitt was superior to Barry Sanders. Now I’m at the point where I feel comfortable saying that Smith had the better career but Sanders was more talented. Few talents in sports history were wasted as needlessly as Barry’s. Unfortunately for Barry, talent can only take you so far on a list like this. The most vivid memory I have of Smith was his remarkable performance in the 1993 regular season finale against the NY Giants in which he touched the ball 42 times for 229 yards with a separated shoulder. He holds countless rushing records including the most rushing yards and rushing touchdowns in NFL history. He won an NFL MVP and a Super Bowl MVP and led the league in rushing four times. Only Jim Brown has won more rushing titles.

8) Deacon Jones

The problem with comparing old-time players in the NFL to present day stars is a) a lack of complete statistics and b) changes in the relevance of certain statistics. Deacon Jones’ official career sack total is zero. The NFL didn’t keep track of sacks until 1982. Had sacks been officially counted during Jones’ career, he would be the all-time single season sack-leader (26 in ’67) and third all-time in career sacks. Jones was certainly the first truly great sackmaster from the defensive end position. He won the Defensive Player of the Year award on two separate occasions. He arguably had as much of an impact on the NFL as any player in league history. He revolutionized the art of pass-rushing and even prompted rule changes ala Kareem Abdul-Jabbar.

9) Don Hutson

What Unitas did for quarterbacks, Don Hutson did for wide receivers. Hutson did things in his career that were previously unheard of. His 99 career receiving touchdowns stood as the all-time record from 1945-1989. He was named the NFL MVP on two different occasions. It is hard to make a comparison to Jerry Rice or even some of the other great wide-outs. Hutson gets credit for doing things that nobody had ever seen before. He led the NFL in receiving yards seven times which is the most in NFL history. He also led the league in touchdown receptions nine times which is, by far, the most in NFL history.

10) Bob Lilly

Bob Lilly could very well be the greatest defensive tackle to play the game. With Lilly anchoring the defense, the Cowboys made the playoffs eight straight years including a Super Bowl win in 1971. Lilly made the Pro-Bowl 10 straight years and was first team All-NFL seven times.

11) Dick Butkus

In my opinion, Butkus has the greatest name in sports history. His legend is among the most noted of all NFL greats. Butkus was a brutal tackler. He made nine Pro Bowls and was selected first team All Pro six times. I had some difficulty separating Butkus from Packers great Ray Nitschke. Some say Nitschke was the greatest linebacker to ever play the game. Although I have no doubt that Nitschke was a phenomenal player, he was only selected to the Pro Bowl one time. I find that extremely curious. Nonetheless, that certainly speaks at least somewhat to Nitschke’s status during his playing days. So, Butkus gets the edge.

12) Otto Graham

Otto Graham’s career at first glance doesn’t look unbelievable. But trust me, it was. First off, Graham’s professional football career didn’t get started until the age of 24 due to his service in the Navy during WWII. As a result, he missed two or three years of his prime. Graham made the most of his time once he made it to professional football. He led the Cleveland Browns to the championship game in every season of his ten-year career. That is a remarkable accomplishment that probably will never be duplicated. His passing numbers don’t look like the numbers put up in the NFL today but compared to the league average at the time, his numbers were phenomenal. He led the NFL in passing yards five times. Nobody has done it more. He also led the NFL in touchdown passes and QB rating three times.

13) Barry Sanders

It is with tremendous disappointment and a considerable amount of bitterness that I put Barry Sanders at #13. I don’t blame him for leaving the Detroit Lions. I just enjoyed watching him play so much that his absence has left an emptiness in my life (sad but true). The reason why Sanders doesn’t rate higher on this list is because of all of the “could haves” that are brought up when talking about his career. He “could have” crushed Walter Payton’s (and now Emmitt Smith’s) all-time rushing record. He “could have” had even more yardage had he had the luxury of running behind one of the greatest lines in NFL history as Smith had. He “could have” won a handful of Super Bowl rings had he played for a team as good as Smith’s Dallas Cowboys. Unfortunately, “could haves” don’t count for a whole lot. Players who missed prime seasons serving in wars “would have” been productive assuming no injuries. The same can’t be said for Sanders because we simply don’t know the dynamics that went into his success in Detroit. Maybe he was the type of running back that was the same with a good or bad O-Line. He usually freelanced or chose his own holes anyways. There’s just no way of knowing. Considering what he accomplished individually and the lack of talent surrounding him, Sanders is the second best running back in NFL history in my opinion. Nobody was more elusive, feared or durable.

14) Tom Brady

When Brady’s career is over, I don’t think there will be any reason to rank him lower than any QB the league has seen. He has already won three Super Bowls with nowhere near the talent that Montana or Manning had the luxury of playing with. His career touchdown to interception ratio is among the best in the history of the game. He now boasts one of the greatest—if not the greatest—season by a quarterback in NFL history with his 50-toudchown, 4,806-yard, 117.2-passer rating effort in 2007. The only thing missing from his resume is longevity which only takes some patience to accomplish. If Brady stays consistent he will end up as one of the top 5-10 players in NFL history.

15) Anthony Munoz

Is Anthony Munoz really the best offensive lineman of all-time, hands down? I really have no idea. I know he is the most “respected” and most “talked about” lineman of all-time. I remember how much he was lauded during his playing days. Munoz was a big, athletic wall. He was named Offensive Lineman of the Year three times. He was selected to eleven Pro Bowls. He is also the highest ranking lineman in NFL history as judged by The Sporting News (#19). If Munoz really is the best lineman in NFL history, then I think he deserves to be rated higher than #19. The offensive line position is the most demanding position in the NFL. Players have to be equally big and athletic to exceed at the position. It’s possible that I have underrated his place in history at #15.

16) Joe Greene

“Mean Joe” Greene was great from the minute he entered the NFL. He won the Defensive Rookie of the Year award in 1969. He won two Defensive Player of the Year awards. Only seven other defensive players have accomplished that feat. And most importantly, he led won of the greatest defenses in NFL history to four Super Bowl titles.

17)Marion Motley

I had a heck of a time trying to compare modern day players to players from earlier in the 20th century. Sports Illustrated’s Dr. Z lists Motley as the greatest football player of all-time. I don’t know how one could prove that. There certainly isn’t any statistical evidence that would indicate he is the best player of all-time. Any notion that he was is based on various eyewitness accounts passed on from one generation to the next. Motley helped lead the Browns to five consecutive championships (four in the AAFC, and one in the NFL). Comparing Motley’s career length and production to that of other players on this list, I can’t rate him any higher than #17.

18) Sammy Baugh

At first, I had little success comparing Sammy Baugh, Otto Graham, and Johnny Unitas. But the more I looked into it, the more it became clear that the order should probably go Unitas, Graham, and then Baugh. Although, I am not certain that Graham shouldn’t be rated ahead of Unitas. Graham was considerably more successful. His statistics compared to the rest of the league were equally impressive. But, Unitas revolutionized the position so I gave him the nod over Graham. Baugh was a tremendous player. He excelled on offense, defense, and special teams. He led the league in passing four times, punting four times, and interceptions once. He also led the league in completion percentage an amazing nine times. He led the Washington Redskins to two NFL Championships and five trips to the Championship-game.

19) Brett Favre

There are a lot of people out there who “hate” Brett Favre. I am not one of those people. I was bummed when he finally retired. I love watching a professional athlete hold on to his/her skills when there is every reason to call it a career. Favre’s career was not short on staggering numbers. He threw for 30+ touchdowns eight times in his career. Marino did it four times. Elway did it zero times. Montana did it once. Moon did it twice. Manning has done it four times. Favre is the all-time leader passing touchdowns and passing yardage. He is the only player in NFL history to win the AP NFL MVP award three straight seasons. Only two other players have even won three AP MVPs (Jim Brown and Johnny Unitas). Favre’s “reckless” style of play definitely has affected his image among the all-time greats. His numbers may have also benefited from Green Bay’s heavy emphasis on the passing game. However, Joe Montana played under a similar emphasis. The only knock on Favre’s resume is that he only won one Super Bowl. The rest of his work is pristine.

20). Steve Young

Young’s resume is a lot like Roger Staubach’s. Young had to wait until he was 31 to get the keys to the 49ers offense. If you compare Young’s career to Montana’s, some measures might make it seem like Young was the better quarterback. Montana won four Super Bowls, though. He is also the greatest Super Bowl and Playoff QB of All-Time. That’s why Montana gets the edge. It’s all about the playoffs. What Young accomplished after the age of 30 is truly remarkable. He led the 49ers to victory in Super Bowl XXIX after winning two rings as a backup to Joe Montana. He won two NFL MVPs as well as a Super Bowl MVP. He is first all-time with a 96.8 career passer rating. He is 3rd all-time in completion percentage. He led the NFL in passer rating six times, touchdown passes four times, and passing yards per game twice. Young didn’t pass for more than 3,000 yards in a season until he was 31. There is no question that having to backup Montana for so many years kept Young from putting up even more impressive statistics.

21) Ray Lewis

Ray Lewis is the best defensive player that I have seen. I got a chance to see “LT” later in his career but I missed out on his spectacular seasons. My memory has failed me in that regard. Lewis is the most physical linebacker I have ever watched play football. He is also second to none, in my opinion, with regard to his ability to pursue the ball-carrier. He has won two Defensive Player of the Year awards and a Super Bowl MVP. His superior play led the Baltimore Ravens to a Super Bowl victory despite having an anemic offense. In fact, the Ravens have been a successful franchise for the better part of a decade without much of an offensive presence. That should give an indication how valuable Lewis has been.

22) Walter Payton

I could’ve put Payton anyplace from 10th to 30th and rationalized it pretty well. Simply gaining a bunch of rushing yards doesn’t make a running back great. Curtis Martin and Jerome Bettis are evidence of that. They were good backs but not great. Payton had something different. He ran with authority. He was a mixture of all styles. He was an elusive bulldozer. Could he have been better than Barry Sanders? I must concede that it is possible. Sanders would have crushed Payton’s all-time rushing record and with a significantly better average yards per carry to boot had he not retired early. Payton had some of Sanders’ misfortune but did manage to hang around long enough to play with the 1985 Chicago Bears. If only Barry had that same good fortune. Despite his “sweetness”, Payton only led the NFL in rushing yards and touchdowns once. That’s why I can’t rate him too much higher.

23) Gino Marchetti

Marchetti got off to a late start in his career because he fought in the Battle of the Bulge among other battles in WWII. He made 10 Pro Bowls and led his team to two NFL Championships. He is also one of only four defensive players to win the NFL MVP. I probably have him underrated compared to other lists but I have him as the fifth best defensive lineman of all-time just ahead of Alan Page. So, his ranking is somewhat determined by their ranking as well.

24) Peyton Manning

If Manning had three Super Bowls like Tom Brady, he would probably be considered the greatest QB of all-time. Manning has some staggering statistics. He has thrown for at least 25 touchdowns in 10 consecutive seasons. No other QB has even come close to that. He has thrown for over 4,000 yards eight times which is the most of any QB in NFL history (although, Brett Favre deserves a nod here. He threw for 4,000 yards five times and then threw between 3,800-3,999 yards seven more times). Manning is second to Steve Young on the all-time passer-rating list. His TD:INT ratio is exactly 2:1 which is one of the best marks in NFL history. He has led the league in passing yards three times, passer rating three times, and touchdowns twice. He also had arguably the greatest passing season in NFL history in ’04 when he threw for 49 touchdowns to only 10 interceptions and had a passer rating of 121.1

25) Dick “Night Train” Lane

What “LT” was to linebackers and Deacon Jones was to defensive ends, Dick “Night Train” Lane was to defensive backs. Lane still holds the record for interceptions in a season at 14. It is interesting, though, that there aren’t many “great” cornerbacks in NFL history. Sure, there have been really good players but Lane seems to be the default choice not necessarily because everyone knows that he was the best ever but because there aren’t many convincing alternatives.

26) Jack Lambert

To be fair to Jack Lambert, there isn’t a clear-cut case that Butkus and Lewis deserve to be rated higher. All three are exceptionally distinguished in NFL history. I do think that the fact that Lambert played for a team that had nine Hall of Famers makes it a little easier to have success. The Steeler-defenses that Lambert played for in the 70’s are considered by many to be the best in NFL history. On defense alone, Lambert had the luxury of playing with “Mean Joe” Greene, Jack Ham, and Mel Blount. That doesn’t mean he wasn’t better than Butkus and Lewis. It just means that the talent-level of the respective teams needs to be taken into account when factoring in team success.

27) John Elway

Marino’s statistics are in a different stratosphere than Elway’s. In fact, I think most people would be shocked to see Elway’s career numbers. He only threw for 30+ touchdowns once in his career. Until Terrell Davis came along, Elway’s numbers were Jake Plummer-esque. But, unlike Plummer and Marino, Elway always had the reputation of being a “gamer”. He took marginally talented Bronco teams to the Super Bowl in 1986, 1987, and 1989. All three appearances resulted in losses but they enhanced Elway’s reputation nonetheless. After his career seemed to be on the decline in the mid-90’s, Elway bounced back with authority to have the six best seasons of his career (other than his marvelous ’85 campaign). Elway remains the only quarterback in NFL history to start in five Super Bowls. He never had the fortune of playing for teams as stacked as the 70’s Steelers, 80’s 49ers, or 90’s Cowboys but his accomplishments are no less impressive.

28) Ronnie Lott

History is tough on safeties and cornerbacks alike. Defensive backs don’t get to parade around gaudy stats like the skill position players so it’s extremely difficult to ascertain a defensive back’s true impact. I have no idea how many times Lott made a mistake in coverage. I don’t know how often he blew an assignment. All I know is that he hit hard, had a ferocious reputation, and played for great football teams. So I must decide where he falls by looking at other factors such as how he compared to other players from the same position and how much he was helped by playing with a phenomenal supporting case. As far as I can tell, Lott is the best safety the NFL has seen. I do think that safeties are the “tight ends” of the defense in terms of how fondly they are remembered. Sure, there have been fantastic players at both positions but the most skilled players on offense and defense probably don’t play either position.

29) Dan Marino

Can an NFL quarterback be the greatest ever without winning a Super Bowl? The frustrating answer to this question is that there is no “right” answer. There are countless opinions on the matter. I don’t necessarily think it’s impossible but I think it’s highly improbable. A quarterback cannot control what the front office does to the team. A similar scenario is what occurred with Barry Sanders while he played for the Lions. Is it fair to downgrade Sanders’ place in history because he had the misfortune of playing for the Detroit Lions? I think you have to give a player in a bad situation the benefit of the doubt. Now, Marino’s situation wasn’t nearly as bad as Barry’s. Marino just never got a running game to compliment his passing attack. John Elway was headed down the exact same path until Terrell Davis came along. Elway got the running game that he long coveted and, in turn, won two Super Bowls. Marino never got the running game and, in turn, won zero Super Bowls.

30) John Hannah

If it sounded like I had a hard time ranking Ronnie Lott, you should’ve seen me struggle with John Hannah. In 1981, Sports Illustrated declared Hannah the greatest offensive lineman of all-time. So, he must have been good. But, how can you tell how good an offensive lineman really is? If you go by team success, then Hannah wasn’t very good at all. If you go by rushing and passing statistics, Hannah was just an average player. But clearly he wasn’t just an “average” player. His teams were never as successful as Munoz’s and his individual honors fall just a tad short as well. He was selected to the First Team All-Pro Team seven times and the Second Team three times which means he was either the best or second best player at his position a remarkable ten times. I can’t place him ahead of Munoz but he is one of the most accomplished o-linemen in NFL history.

31) Alan Page

You can tell a lot about a player by the way they are talked about by other NFL greats. I must confess I hadn’t heard the same hoopla about Page as I did about Butkus, Deacon Jones, and even Gino Marchetti. That makes me wonder a little about how good Page really was. However, accomplishments don’t lie. Page is one of only four players to win the NFL MVP as a defender. Page was the leader of the “Purple People Eaters” defense (an all-time favorite nickname of mine) that went to three Super Bowls. He was named All-Pro six times and made nine Pro Bowls. He may not have the same name recognition as some of the other “greats” but his profile is among the best ever.

32) Deion Sanders

As far as I’m concerned, Deion Sanders is about as good as a modern day defensive back can be. He was a “hired gun” during his prime with the San Francisco 49ers and Dallas Cowboys as both teams used him to win Super Bowls. Sanders was often criticized for not being a physical cornerback and a reluctance to provide run support. Criticizing Sanders for that would be like criticizing Colonel Sanders for not perfecting the hamburger. Deion’s job was to shutdown the opposition’s best receiver and he did that better than anyone. Throw in the fact that Sanders is one of the most dangerous return men to play the sport and you have a top 35 player, easily.

33) LaDanian Tomlinson

If Tomlinson doesn’t get hurt, he might challenge Jim Brown for the top spot on the running back list. That is saying quite a bit considering he’d have to pass Walter Payton, Emmitt Smith and Barry Sanders along the way. Tomlinson is a two-way threat much in the same mold as Marshall Faulk except Tomlinson is a considerably better runner than Faulk was. LT already has 129 touchdowns in just 7 seasons. He had 31 touchdowns in 2006 alone. LT is well on his way to shattering every major running back record. I may have rated him a little low but I’m not really concerned with that right now. By the time he is finished, he’ll be in the company of a whole different group of greats.

34) Roger Staubach

Upon the completion of my first draft, Staubach was nowhere to be seen in the top 50. In fact, I was actually trying to cut down on the amount of quarterbacks on the list (as not to give undue favoritism to certain positions) when I realized that I could not keep Staubach off. Staubach didn’t start his NFL career until he was 27 years old because of his service in the Navy. Even more remarkable is that by the age of 31, Staubach only had one season as an everyday starting quarterback (sound a bit like Steve Young?). Staubach didn’t waste his time once he became a starting quarterback leading the Dallas Cowboys to four Super Bowl appearances and two victories. Staubach won the Super Bowl MVP award in his first season as a starter with the Cowboys. He led the league in a number of offensive categories throughout his career. He is also remembered for his legendary fourth quarter performances that resulted in 23 come from behind victories. Had Staubach not started his full-time gig ten years behind most NFL players, his career numbers would be as impressive as his postseason accomplishments.

35) Forrest Gregg

Vince Lombardi said that Forrest Gregg was the best player that he ever coached. I’m not one to disagree with Lombardi especially on the merits of his own team so Gregg chimes in as the highest rated player who was coached by Lombardi.

36) Bronco Nagurski

Back in the early part of the 20th century, the fullback (along with quarterback) position was usually played by the best player on the team. Without the forward pass, the primary need for a team to have success was a bruising fullback who was equally good carrying the ball or clearing the way for a teammate. Offensive statistics from that era do not compare to the modern era so statistical comparisons prove to be fruitless. All I can really do is try to put Nagurski’s career in perspective as it pertains to the rest of the great players in NFL history. Nagurski led the Bears to a 78-21-12 record during his playing days. He was a four-time All-Pro in just seven full seasons. He also won three NFL Championships with the Bears.

37) Ray Nitschke

Ray Nitschke falls in the same mold as Dick Butkus and Jack Lambert as the quintessential brutalizing middle linebacker. Despite Vince Lombardi’s proclamations, Nitschke is often listed higher on all-time lists ahead of Forrest Gregg. I read story after story about Nitschke’s legend. I was all ready to put him in the top 15 or 20 when I came across an interesting and possibly telling statistic. Nitschke was selected to the Pro Bowl one time in his career. I don’t even know how that is possible. That is by far the worst total of any player on this list. It is possible for players to be remembered as being better than they actually were. I don’t think that is the case here because Nitschke was voted as the “greatest linebacker of all-time” in 1969 which was before his career ended.

38) Marshall Faulk

I have suspicions that a lot of people have forgotten how good Marshall Faulk was which is interesting considering how recently he played in the NFL. Faulk was named the AP Offensive Player of the Year three times. No player in NFL history has won the award more. Faulk gained over 2,000 total yards four straight seasons which is a feat that no other player in NFL history has accomplished. He holds the single season record for most yards from scrimmage and at one point held the record for single-season touchdowns. In 2000, he won the NFL MVP award and in 2001, led the Rams to their second Super Bowl appearance in three seasons. St. Louis’ league leading offense was entirely predicated on Faulk’s versatility. His accomplishments are second-to-none as far as running backs go. His dominance as an “all-around” back is every bit equal to what Emmitt Smith accomplished running the football.

39) Earl Campbell

I came very close to omitting Earl Campbell from the top 50 but I ended up coming to my senses before it was too late. Campbell is one of four running backs to lead the NFL in rushing for three consecutive seasons (Jim Brown, Emmitt Smith, and Steve Van Buren are the others). Aside from Brown, Campbell was the most punishing runner the league has ever seen. I normally wouldn’t have included a player whose career was so short but Campbell’s career was short because of the shear number of times he touched the ball and the punishment that he took when he carried it.

40) Marvin Harrison

Marvin Harrison is the most underappreciated player in the NFL. His routes are the most crisp in the league. Harrison owns at least ten NFL records and is on pace to steal many of Jerry Rice’s spots in the record books. Harrison recorded at least 1,100 yards and ten touchdowns in eight straight seasons. Barring an injury, Harrison will finish second in just about every career receiving/touchdown record in the NFL behind Jerry Rice. With averages better than Rice, Harrison could become the all-time leader in touchdowns and yards if he opts to play as long as Rice did.

41) Larry Allen

Is it possible for a guard to be better than Larry Allen? I’m not sure it is. Allen was versatile—he made the Pro Bowl at three different offensive line positions. Allen was strong—he is, in all likelihood, the strongest player in NFL history having bench pressed 700+ pounds. Allen was accomplished—he was named All-Pro eight times and a Pro Bowl selection ten times. He also helped form one of the great offensive lines the league has ever seen for the 1995 Dallas Cowboy Super Bowl team. It would be tough for a guard to have a better career than Allen’s.

42) Mel Blount

Blount generally falls behind “Mean Joe” Green and Jack Lambert in terms of the great players from the “Steel Curtain.” Blount’s career wasn’t as accomplished individually as either Green or Lambert’s. Blount was selected to the Pro Bowl five times while Green and Lambert were selected 10 and nine times respectively. It’s important to note that falling short of Green and Lambert is nothing to scoff it. Blount helped lead the Steelers to four Super Bowl Championships and was named the Defensive Player of the Year in 1975.

43) Lance Alworth

Alworth’s numbers don’t jump off the page when compared to the players from present day. However, considering the time period that Alworth put up his numbers, his accomplishments are staggering. His impact on professional football is similar to what Johnny Unitas accomplished. Both still have impressive totalss compared to contemporary players but their accomplishments at the time were revolutionary.

44) Bruce Smith

Should the all-time sacks leader be ranked this low? That’s a difficult question to answer. I think Reggie White gets the edge in a head-to-head comparison. Smith played longer than everyone else which helped in his pursuit of the all-time sack record. He also has the luxury of not having the sack statistic count prior to 1982. That’s not to say that Smith wasn’t great. It’s just important to put numbers in context before overvaluing them. Smith was named the NFL Defensive Player of the Year twice. He was also selected to 11 Pro Bowls. He led the Buffalo Bills to four straight Super Bowl appearances. If Smith isn’t a top 50 NFL player of all-time, then I don’t know who is.

45) Willie Lanier

Lanier is one of the great middle-linebackers in pro football history. He started his career when the Kansas City Chiefs were still in the AFL. Between the AFL and NFL, he was selected to eight consecutive Pro Bowl and All-Pro teams. Lanier was also selected to the NFL’s 75th Anniversary All-Time Team.

46) Jim Parker
Parker was a highly accomplished offensive tackle for the Baltimore Colts. He was selected to eight Pro Bowls. He teamed with Johnny Unitas to lead the Colts to two NFL Championships. He is probably the greatest offensive lineman pre-1970.

47) Merlin Olsen

I miss the old Merlin Olsen florist commercials. It’s amazing that a guy as wholesome looking as he was in those commercials could be so menacing on the football field. He has the most Pro Bowl appearances of any defender in NFL history. He teamed with Deacon Jones to form part of the famed “Fearsome Foursome” that anchored the Los Angeles Rams defense in the 60’s and 70’s. Although Olsen was clearly a dominating force, there is no question that he benefited from the attention that was paid to Deacon Jones. That is why I don’t have him rated higher.

48) Herb Adderley

I doubt the average NFL fan has ever heard of Herb Adderley. He was the premier defensive back of the 60’s. He is only one of two players to play for six NFL Championship teams. He won three Super Bowls (two with Green Bay and one with Dallas). He was also selected to five Pro Bowls.

49) Mike Singletary

Mike Singletary was the premier linebacker when I started to follow professional football as a kid. His instincts are stuff of legend. He was named the NFL Defensive Player of the Year twice. He was also selected to ten Pro Bowls. He was the backbone to what is often regarded as the greatest defense in NFL history—the ’85 Bears.

50) Terrell Owens

Aside from Owens’ constant distractions, he is unquestionably one of the most dominating players the NFL has ever seen. He is virtually impossible to defend one on one. He is extremely strong and physical. The level of speed for a man his size is unique to the NFL. He will likely finish in the top three in both receiving yards and receiving touchdowns. If he can stay clear of off-field issues for the remainder of his career, (which is asking a lot) then his place in NFL history is much higher than where I have him right now. Owens could be knocked out of the top 50 if he doesn’t keep putting up big-time numbers. I just can’t ignore the fact that, on the field, he has been among the best wide receivers ever. I thought for sure that Moss would be much higher than Owens on this list but Moss mysteriously tanked for a few seasons. Now that Moss appears rejuvenated with NE, the race is one to see who will have the better career. Moss is three years younger so he’ll have a chance to catch T.O.

51) Joe Schmidt

Schmidt is another NFL great living in anonymity. He is one of only four defensive players in NFL history to win the league’s MVP award. He was selected to ten Pro Bowls while leading the Detroit Lions to two NFL Championships. Apparently, the Lions were good at some point in history.

52). Rod Woodson

I’m not convinced that I haven’t underrated Woodson. An argument could be made that he is the greatest defensive back in NFL history which would put him in the top 20 of all-time. I’ll need more time to digest his career before putting him in that company. Woodson tore his ACL in 1995 which ended up causing a move to safety. Without the injury, it’s not a stretch to say that he was on his way to becoming the best ever at the position. Even with the position-switch, Woodson became one of the best safeties in the league. As a safety, he made five Pro Bowls and was selected All-Pro three times. He helped the Baltimore Ravens to victory in Super Bowl XXXV. As a cornerback, he was named the Defensive Player of the Year in 1993, was selected All-Pro six times, and made six Pro Bowls. Woodson is first all-time in interception returns for TDs, second all-time in non-offensive touchdowns, and second all-time in interceptions. Woodson played in three Super Bowls and was one of the best kick/punt-returners in NFL history.

53). Randy Moss

Moss and T.O. are in a battle for the third best wide receiver of all-time. Right now, I have Marvin Harrison at #3 but he is slowing down and could be passed by both. Moss and T.O. will have an opportunity to surpass Harrison if they can continue their current level of production. I have T.O. over Moss by a sliver just because T.O. is more physical and runs better routes. Moss is the best “home run” threat in NFL history but I think T.O. is a more versatile receiver. It’s not by much and I don’t think it’s set in stone. Moss could pass T.O. with ease with another season like ’07. Moss has led the NFL in touchdown catches four times and holds three of the top five single-season totals in NFL history. He holds the record for most TD catches in a season at 23. Only Jerry Rice and Don Hutson have led the league more times. Moss is fourth all-time in both touchdowns and receiving yards.

54). Derrick Brooks

Brooks is one of the more underappreciated players in the NFL. Most savvy fans know how good he has been but he doesn’t get near the recognition as someone like Ray Lewis. Brooks is one of only four players in NFL history to be selected to 10+ Pro Bowls, voted Defensive Player of the Year, and win a Super Bowl. Ray Lewis will join Brooks, Samurai Mike, The Minister of Defense, and LT in that club next season if he can make the Pro Bowl. Brooks holds the record for most interception returns for TDs in a season by a linebacker and was named the MVP of the 2006 Pro Bowl.

55) Bruce Matthews

The O-line is the most grueling position in the NFL. Every offensive play, O-linemen get pounded on by the defense. They don’t get the notoriety as the skill-position players but that doesn’t make them any less important. It’s not as easy to judge a great lineman as it is to judge a great running back. There aren’t telling statistics like yards and touchdowns. There is however, longevity and honors. Matthews was selected to 14 Pro Bowls which is tied with Merlin Olsen for the most of any player in NFL history. Matthews played 296 games in 19 seasons. Both marks are the most by any lineman that has played the game.

56). Sid Luckman

I initially underrated Luckman and even now I might have him ranked lower than he should be. He is easily one of the least recognized stars in NFL history. The novice fan has probably heard of Johnny U, Joe Montana and even Fran Tarkenton. Most probably have never even heard of Luckman. Luckman led the Chicago Bears to four NFL Championships in seven years. He QB’d the Bears to their infamous 73-0 drubbing of Sammy Baugh’s Redskins in the 1940 Championship Game. Luckman led the NFL in yards and touchdowns three times each. He was the first QB in NFL history to throw for 400 yards in a game. He still holds the record for most passing touchdowns in a game at 7. He is also won the NFL MVP in 1943.

57). Eric Dickerson

Dickerson led the NFL in rushing four times. Only Jim Brown has done it more. Dickerson holds the record for most rushing yards in a season at 2,105. He holds three of the top 18 single-season rushing totals in NFL history. He is the only running back in NFL history with three seasons of 1,800+ rushing yards. He is 6th all-time in rushing yards and 12 all-time in rushing touchdowns. Dickerson was the precursor to the big, strong, fast running backs in the NFL today like Adrian Peterson and Darren McFadden.
58). Bart Starr

It’s difficult to put QBs on great teams into context. They are the most popular players in the NFL and there have been a boatload of good ones. The problem is that so many have won multiple Super Bowls–which is supposed to be the mark of a great QB–that it’s hard to get a feel for where a QB stands in NFL history. It seems like Starr is vastly underrated at #58 since he led the Packers to two Super Bowl wins and five NFL Championships overall. I think it’s important to not give in to the urge to overrate QBs. They touch the ball on every possession. By definition, they are responsible for more than any other player on the team. A pretty good QB can take a great team and lead it to championships. Troy Aikman and Terry Bradshaw are examples of this. Neither was an unbelievable QB. Some may disagree on Bradshaw but he was a below average QB in the regular season. He stepped up come Super Bowl time but that just proves my point. Team success can make a QB look a lot better than he actually is. Starr is an all-time great. That’s not the question here. The question is how to interpret his five championships. He was selected as an All-Pro just once and never led the NFL in passing touchdowns or yards. That’s why he doesn’t rate higher.

59). Chuck Bednarik

Bednarik was the last of the two-way players. He played both center and linebacker. He was an integral part of Philadelphia’s championships in 1949 and 1960. He was selected as an All-Pro ten times and was named the MVP of the 1953 Pro Bowl. Bednarik was a devastating tackler. If you ever get an opportunity to view the NFL Films special on Bednarik, I highly recommend it.

60). Fran Tarkenton

Tarkenton was the first Dan Marino–not in terms of style but in terms of accomplishments and championships. You’ll find his name on the leaderboard of just about every measurable QB statistic. He is fifth all-time in passing yards and third all-time in passing TDs. He was also the first great running/passing QB having rushed for over 4,000 yards in his career which is the 4th highest total for a QB. His 125 wins as a starting QB are fourth most in NFL history. He won the NFL MVP in 1975. He was the Pro Bowl MVP in 1964. He led the Vikings to three Super Bowl appearances. Like Marino, though, Tarkenton was never able to win a Super Bowl. That keeps him out of the upper-tier of QBs.

61). Steve Van Buren

Van Buren was the first true “workhorse” in NFL history and that cost him his career. He only played eight seasons but they were jam-packed with accomplishments. Van Buren led the NFL in rush-attempts four times. Only Jim Brown has done it more. Van Buren led the NFL in rushing yards four times . Only Jim Brown has done it more. Van Buren led the NFL in rushing for three consecutive seasons. Only Jim Brown, Emmitt Smith, and Earl Campbell have accomplished that. Van Buren led the NFL in rushing TDs four times. Only Jim Brown has accomplished that. There seems to be a theme here. Few players in NFL history have accomplished what Van Buren accomplished. He was selected as an All-Pro in seven of his eight seasons. He retired as the all-time career leader in rushing yards and rushing touchdowns. He also led the Eagles to back-to-back NFL Championships in ’48 and ’49. The more I write, the more I think I may have underrated him.

62). Jonathan Ogden

At 6’9, 345 lbs, Ogden is one of the largest players in NFL history. Ogden uses his size and unique athleticism to dominate opposing d-linemen. He has made the Pro Bowl 11 times in 12 seasons. Only 33 years old, Ogden is well within reach of Merlin Olsen’s record of 14 Pro Bowl selections. Ogden led the Ravens to victory in Super Bowl XXXV. He also helped pave the way for Jamal Lewis’ 2066 yards in 2003 which is the second best rushing total in NFL history. Lewis also broke the single-game rushing record that season with 295 yards.

63). Ken Houston

Houston was selected to more Pro Bowls than any other DB in NFL history. In 14 seasons, Houston made 12 Pro Bowls. Houston holds the record for most defensive touchdowns in a season. He scored 5 in 1971. Houston is 3rd all-time with 11 career defensive touchdowns behind only Deion Sanders and Aeneas Williams.

64). Randy White

White is one of the great defensive tackles in NFL history. Sacks weren’t officially recorded until later in his career which has stifled his reputation as a ferocious pass-rusher. He recorded 12.5 sacks at the age of 30 and 31 and then tallied a 10.5-sack season at the age of 32. Unofficially, White has 111 career sacks which is one of the highest totals of any tackle in NFL history. He helped lead the Cowboys to victory in Super Bowl XII in which he was named MVP. He was named an All-Pro nine times and was selected to nine Pro Bowls.

65). Michael Strahan

Strahan is 5th all-time in “official” career sacks and 9th all-time on the “unofficial” list that includes players before 1982. Strahan is one of only four players to have led the NFL in sacks in multiple years since the sack was officially recorded in ’82. He is one of only two players to have two seasons of at least 18.5 sacks. He holds the all-time single season sack record at 22.5. He was named Defensive Player of the Year in 2001. He helped lead the Giants to two Super Bowl appearances and a victory in Super Bowl XLII.

66). Ted Hendricks

Hendricks is one of the great linebackers the league has ever seen and there is a pretty good chance that I have underrated him. He led the defenses for four Super Bowl Champions. He is the all-time leader in blocked kicks at 25. He is the all-time leader in safeties. He is the only player in NFL history with at least 60 sacks and 25 interceptions. In 15 seasons, he was selected as an All-Pro 11 times.

67). Mel Hein

Hein is probably the most decorated center in NFL history. He is the only offensive lineman who has won the NFL MVP which he won in 1938. That was also the first MVP ever awarded by the NFL. He helped lead the NY Giants to seven NFL Championship appearances in nine seasons including two NFL Championships in ’34 and ’38. In 15 seasons, Hein never missed a game.

68). Junior Seau

Seau’s career would’ve been properly stamped with a Patriots win in Super Bowl XLII. Unfortunately, the Pats couldn’t cap off their perfect regular season with Seau’s first Super Bowl ring. While a ring would be nice, Seau’s career has already been cemented as one of the best by a linebacker in league history. With two more interceptions, Seau would become only the second player in NFL history to record at least 50 sacks and 20 interceptions (Ted Hendricks is the other). Seau has been selected to 12 Pro Bowls.

69). Jack Ham

Ham was one of the all-time great players on one of the all-time great defenses. He played with Mean Joe Greene, Jack Lambert, and Mel Blount who are all in my top 100 of all-time. That unit led the Steelers to four Super Bowl wins in six years. Ham was an all-around linebacker. He was one of the fastest linebackers of his time. He was regarded as one of the most intelligent players in the game. And, he was a ferocious hitter. He is one of only eight players who are officially part of the 20/20 club and he was selected All-Pro seven times.

70). Emlen Tunnell

Tunnell is second all-time in interceptions behind only Dick “Night Train” Lane. He was selected to the Pro Bowl nine times. He was an integral part in the New York Giants winning the NFL Championship in 1956. He was also a member of the Green Bay Packers for their Championship in 1961. Tunnell was also one of the great returners in NFL history. He ranks 5th all-time in kickoff return yardage and 14th all-time in punt return yardage.

71). Mike Webster

It’s difficult to recognize Webster’s playing career without mentioning the tragedy that said career gave way to. Webster sustained significant trauma over his 17-year career which led to a number of mental and physical issues and, ultimately, his death. Webster was a nine-time Pro Bowl selection and a winner of four Super Bowl Champions as a Pittsburgh Steeler. He was selected as a center on both the NFL’s 1970s and 1980s teams.

72). Warren Sapp

Sapp was as dominant as he was controversial. He is the only defensive tackle in NFL history to record 16+ sacks in a season, win a Super Bowl, and win a Defensive Player of the Year Award. Sapp led the moribund Tampa Bay Buccaneers to one of the most dominating defenses in NFL history. He also ranks second all-time in sacks by a defensive tackle behind only John Randle.

73). Willie Brown

I think it’s safe to say that Brown is one of the few undrafted players on this list. He caught on with the Denver Broncos and then made it big-time as a member of the Oakland Raiders. Brown made nine Pro Bowls and was selected to the NFL All-70s. Team. He also could’ve—and probably should’ve—been selected to the All-60s team. He helped lead the Raiders to victory in Super Bowl X with a 75-yard interception return for a TD. He also helped the Raiders get to Super Bowl II where they fell short against the Green Bay Packers.

74). Bobby Layne

The old-timers will tell you that Layne’s greatness wasn’t necessarily found in his stats but rather his leadership and toughness. Sports Illustrated proclaimed Layne “The Toughest Quarterback Who Ever Lived” in 1995. That may be true but I wouldn’t underestimate his statistics and accolades. When Layne retired in 1962, he was the career leader in passing yards and passing touchdowns. Layne finished in the top five in passing yards and passing touchdowns nine times. And most importantly, he led the Detroit Lions–yes, the Detroit Lions–to three NFL Championships in five seasons.

75). Terry Bradshaw

There are a lot of people out there who will passionately argue that Bradshaw is one of the five greatest quarterbacks who ever lived. I’m equally passionate that he’s not. I’m not going to deny that he was a very good QB when the Steelers needed him to be. However, there are two things that cannot be disputed that I can’t get over. 1). Bradshaw played for the greatest assembly of talent the league has ever seen. His numbers weren’t great yet that team still destroyed the NFL. So, attributing four Super Bowls to Bradshaw’s greatness is not a great argument. 2). Bradshaw played great in the playoffs which is very important. He did not play great, however, in the regular season which is where the bulk of the games are played. Great players are judged by their total resume. Bradshaw was merely an average regular season QB. It is solely by his Super Bowl success that he ends up on this list at all. I don’t think being #75 on the all-time list is such a bad thing. There is a difference, IMO, between Bradshaw and Troy Aikman. Aikman was a better regular season QB and led the Cowboys to three Super Bowl Titles. The difference is small but it’s there nonetheless. Bradshaw won one more Super Bowl MVP and won one more Super Bowl. The result is Bradshaw at 75 and Aikman just missing the cut.

76). Derrick Thomas

When I was a kid, Hank Gathers was my favorite college basketball player, Chris Benoit was my favorite wrestler, and Derrick Thomas was my favorite football player. I remember the days that all three died like they were yesterday. I started following Thomas when he was at Alabama and had his annual battle with Tracy Rocker and the Auburn Tigers. When Thomas got to the NFL, it was on. He made the Pro Bowl in his rookie season when he recorded 10 sacks. He tallied 20 sacks in his second season which led the league and still stands as the 6th highest single-season total of all-time. He holds the record for most sacks in a single game at 7. He also holds the record for most forced fumbles in a career. In just 11 seasons, Thomas tallied 126.5 sacks which is good for 11th on the all-time list. He was also selected to nine Pro Bowls in just 11 seasons. Thomas played his last NFL season at 32.

77). Roosevelt Brown

Brown was an integral part in the great Giants teams of the 50s and 60s that also featured Emlen Tunnell, Y.A. Tittle, Sam Huff, and Frank Gifford among others. Brown plowed the Giants to the 1956 NFL Championship as they hammered the Bears 47-7. Brown combined his size and athleticism to dominate his era. He was selected to nine Pro Bowls and was a First Team All-Pro six times.

78). Franco Harris

Franco gets lost in the annals of NFL history for two reasons, in my opinion… 1).I think he gets overshadowed by some of his own teammates from the Steelers dynasty. 2). I think people remember him more for the Immaculate Reception than anything else. Harris had quite a spectacular career though. Has made nine consecutive Pro Bowls as a running back. That is unheard of. He is 10th on the all-time rushing TD-list and 11th on the all-time rushing yards-list. He played on four Super Bowl Championship teams with the Steelers and was the MVP of Super Bowl IX.

79). Willie Wood

Like Willie Brown, Wood was not drafted. He was picked up by the Green Bay Packers and five Championships later, he had played a Hall of Fame career. Wood was selected to the Pro Bowl eight times and was named First Team All-Pro six times. He was also an accomplished punt and kick returner.

80). Gene Upshaw

Before everyone hated Upshaw, he was a beast on the O-Line. He helped lead the Oakland Raiders to two Super Bowl victories and three appearances. Upshaw’s 15-year career included seven Pro Bowl selections and five First Team All-Pro selections. Upshaw started every game over his first 14 seasons.

81). Gale Sayers

Sayers is the Sandy Koufax of the NFL only more severely tilted towards brevity than even Koufax. There is no denying Sayers’s greatness. He was easily one of the 10 most electrifying and unstoppable players to ever set foot on a football field. Sayers essentially played five seasons. There is no question that they were five productive seasons. He was named First Team All-Pro in each of those five seasons. He led the NFL in rushing twice and he won three Pro Bowl MVPs. Sayers had a great start to a career but he was done by 26. Longevity–even just 10 seasons–plays a huge role in putting together a list like this.

82). Norm Van Brocklin

In terms of his place in NFL history, I think Van Brocklin is underrated. He was not included on The Sporting News’ list of the 100 greatest players and I think that’s an injustice. I’m not sure how someone could look at Van Brocklin’s career and argue he wasn’t one of the 100 best players of all-time. I would even argue that I have underrated Van Brocklin on this list. He took his teams to four NFL Championship games. He won the NFL Championship in ’51 and ’60. The ’60-Championship was Vince Lombardi’s only playoff loss. Van Brocklin was the NFL MVP in 1960. He was selected to nine Pro Bowls. He holds the single-game passing record for yards in a game at 554. He finished in the top four in the NFL in passing yards ten times and led the league in yards in ’54. He finished in the top five in touchdown passes and passer rating eight times. His resume stacks up pretty well with most of the great QBs in league history.

83). Tony Gonzalez

You won’t find too many tight ends on this list but Tony G. is certainly on it. Kellen Winslow was a revolutionary tight end because he brought a wide receiver-feel to the position. Winslow might have inspired new use for the tight end position but I think he is often overrated. I’m not saying he wasn’t good. There have been 500 good players in NFL history. I’m just saying that Winslow barely makes the top 100 while others swear top 50 is better suited. Winslow led the NFL in receptions twice and had three 1,000 yard seasons. That was it. His career was plagued by injuries. In his short stint as a star, he was a game-changer and had a great career for a tight end. However, Antonio Gates is one season away from having an equally great career and nobody is ready to put Gates on a top 100 list. Winslow was important but his production doesn’t stand up to Tony G’s. Gonzalez, on the other hand, is a different story. Gonzalez will go down as the greatest tight end who ever played at least statistically speaking. He has had seven seasons of at least 900 yards (Winslow had three). Gonzalez is a nine-time Pro Bowler (Winslow made the Pro Bowl five times). Gonzalez is 14th on the all-time receptions list which is amazing considering he’s a tight end. He will have an excellent shot at finishing in the top 10 all-time in receiving yards which, again, is amazing considering his position. As a tight end, he is the leader in just about every statistic for that position. He will likely pass Shannon Sharpe in Game Two of 2008 as the all-time yardage leader for tight ends.

84). Bobby Bell

Bell was the original Brian Urlacher. He was 6’4, 230 lbs and could run the 40 in 4.5. He anchored the Chiefs defense along with Buck Buchanan on their way to victory in Super Bowl IV. Bell played 12 seasons—all for the Chiefs—and was selected to nine Pro Bowls. He is also an unofficial member of the 20/20 club.

85). Will Shields

The three-spot run on Chiefs has been totally accidental but fitting for a franchise that has had very good players who have played their entire careers in KC. Shields is easily one of the best guards the league has ever seen. The Chiefs never achieved team success in the playoffs but during Shields’ playing days, KC had one of the most prolific rushing attacks in the league. Shields paved the way for historically significant seasons by Priest Holmes–who set the record for most rushing touchdowns and most total rushing/receiving touchdowns in a season in 2003–and Larry Johnson. Johnson became only the third back in league history to rush for at least 1,750 yards in back-to-back seasons (Eric Dickerson and Terrell Davis are the others). Shields was selected to 12 Pro Bowls in 14 seasons. He started 230 consecutive games over his career and never missed a game in 14 seasons.

86). O.J. Simpson

Simpson gets bunched in with Sayers and Winslow on my list. Longevity is important. Production is even more important. And, the combination of both is the gold standard. Simpson was a great running back for five seasons. He led the NFL in rushing yards four times and rushing touchdowns twice. He was the NFL MVP in 1973. Simpson’s career was not much better than Terrell Davis’s, though. Of his 11 seasons, only five of them were above average. Plus, he never won anything as a player. That’s why you won’t see him close to the top 50 on my list.

87). Champ Bailey

It’s getting to the point where Bailey has to be considered one of the all-time greats. Nobody throws his way anymore. He is one of the most physically gifted players in NFL history. He has made the Pro Bowl in eight consecutive seasons. If he avoids serious injury, I think you’ll see him skyrocket up this list by the time his career is finished.

88). Mel Renfro

Renfro didn’t get any love from The Sporting News in ’99 as he was left of their list. Renfro was selected to the Pro Bowl in each of his first 10 seasons. Ken Houston and Rod Woodson are the only defensive backs in history with more Pro Bowl appearances. He helped lead the Cowboys to four Super Bowl appearances and victories in Super Bowls VI and XII. He also led the NFL in punt return and kick return yards in 1964.

89). Shannon Sharpe

Tony Gonzalez is the best tight end of all-time but that honor used to go to Sharpe. In fact, I suppose an argument could still be made that Sharpe should be #1. His career numbers are eerily similar to Tony G’s and Sharpe was an integral part of three Super Bowl Champions. Gonzalez has never come close to reaching the Super Bowl. Gonzalez is only 32, though, and will likely distance himself from Sharpe significantly by the time his career is over.

90). Bill George

George was one of the first–if not the first–great middle linebackers. He was a stalwart on the ’63 Bears defense that led the league in virtually every defensive category including points against at an incredible 9.6 per game. The Bears went on to win the NFL Championship that year as well. George was selected First Team All-Pro an amazing eight times.

91). Y.A. Tittle

Like Van Brocklin, Tittle is one of the most underrated players in NFL history. Sporting News didn’t find it fit to put him in their top 100 in ’99. I’m not sure how that decision could possibly be rationalized. Tittle won four NFL MVPs. No player in NFL history has won more MVPs. Jim Brown is the only other player with four. That alone should put Tittle in everyone’s top 100. Tittle holds the record for most touchdown passes in a game with 7. He led the NFL in touchdown passes three times. Only four players have led the league more. He finished in the top five in passing yards and passer rating ten times in his career. He finished in the top five in passing touchdowns eight times in his career. Tittle never won an NFL Championship which keeps him from being rated higher but he did take the Giants to three consecutive title games.

92). Randall McDaniel

McDaniel and Will Shields are fairly indistinguishable. McDaniel started every game for the Vikings from 1990 to 2001. Like Shields, McDaniel was selected to exactly 12 Pro Bowls in 14 seasons. McDaniel also was selected First Team All-Pro seven times.

93). Yale Lary

Lary was selected to nine Pro Bowls as a member of the Detroit Lions. That number likely would’ve been 11 had he not missed two seasons in his prime serving in the military. He won three NFL Championships as a member of the Lions. He was extremely versatile acting as a defensive back, kick/punt returner and punter. Lary was one of the best punters in NFL history leading the league three times. He was selected to the NFL’s All-50’s team as safety.

94). Larry Wilson

Wilson was to “safety blitz” what Bill George was to middle linebacker. The Cardinals experimented with blitzing the safety and Wilson was the guy who made it effective. He is considered one of the toughest players who ever played. He was selected to the NFL’s All-60s and All-70s teams and made eight Pro Bowls. He was also selected First Team All-Pro six times.

95). Darrell Green

Green’s career is somewhat difficult to put in perspective. There is no doubt he was very good. He is the fastest man in NFL history. He played an astonishing 20 seasons as a defensive back which is the most difficult position to play in the NFL. He played in three Super Bowls and helped lead the Redskins to wins in Super Bowls XXII and XXVI. Where it becomes difficult to judge is that Green was selected to the First Team All-Pro just once in 20 seasons. He also managed just seven Pro Bowls in 20 seasons. I’m comfortable with Green being on the fringe of the top 90-100 players. Anything higher than that is probably a little unreasonable.

96). Sam Huff

Huff was a member of the stacked NY Giants squads of the 50s. Not only did the team feature a number of all-time greats, the coaching staff was equally impressive. The offensive coordinator was Vince Lombardi and the defensive coordinator was Tom Landry. Huff anchored the ’56 Giants defense that led the league in yards allowed on its way to the NFL Championship. He was name a Pro Bowl five times and was selected First Team All-Pro twice.

97). Torry Holt

Holt’s place in NFL history will surprise a lot of people. At 31, he has already made the Pro Bowl seven times and has put together one of the greatest runs ever seen by a wide receiver. He is the only player in NFL history with six consecutive seasons of at least 1,300 yards receiving. He holds the 5th and 9th best single-season receiving totals in NFL history. He is quickly climbing the all-time lists for receptions, yards, and touchdowns. In two seasons, he’ll likely be in the top five all-time in receptions and yards and in the top ten in touchdowns. No player has reached 11,000 yards receiving faster. Holt also holds the record for most receiving yards per game over a career at 84.7.

98). Kellen Winslow

Despite a relatively short career, Winslow’s career was significant. He was the first game-changing tight end that could spread the field like a wide receiver. Winslow made five Pro Bowls and was First Team All-Pro three times. He led the league in receptions in back-to-backs seasons. He still holds the single-season receiving record for tight ends. Winslow’s notoriety will probably start to dwindle as more freakish tight ends take over the position a la Antonio Gates.

99). Willie Roaf

Roaf was a monstrosity of a man at 6’5, 320 lbs in his playing days. In the latter portion of his career, he teamed with Will Shields to give the Chiefs one of the best rushing attacks in the league. Roaf was selected to the Pro Bowl 11 times in his 13-year career.

100). Raymond Berry

Berry was the second great wide receiver following Don Hutson. Berry led the NFL in receptions and yards three times each. He also led the NFL in touchdowns twice. Berry helped lead the Colts to back-to-back NFL Championships in ’58 and ’59. Only Don Hutson led the NFL in receptions more and only Jerry Rice and Hutson led the NFL in receiving yards more.

Honorable mention (in no particular order): Warren Moon, Troy Aikman, Jim Kelly, Dan Fouts, Sonny Jurgensen, Joe Namath, Kurt Warner, Frank Gifford, Jim Taylor, Lenny Moore, Marcus Allen, Thurman Thomas, Curtis Martin, Tony Dorsett, Shaun Alexander, Jerome Bettis, Terrell Davis, Cris Carter, Tim Brown, Crazy Legs Hirsch, Steve Largent, Fred Biletnikoff, Michael Irvin, Lynn Swann, Jim Otto, Gary Zimmerman, Ron Yary, Walter Jones, Tom Mack, Jackie Slater, Steve Wisniewski, Orlando Pace, Dan Dierdorf, Steve Hutchinson, Dwight Stephenson, Jerry Kramer, Mike Ditka, John Mackey, Antonio Gates, Randy Gradishar, Harry Carson, Brian Urlacher, Dave Wilcox, Nick Buoniconti, Kevin Greene, Cortez Kennedy, Jack Youngblood, Buck Buchanan, Richard Dent, Lee Roy Selmon, Dan Hampton, John Randle, Carl Eller, Doug Atkins, Howie Long, Ernie Stautner, Leo Nomellini, Chris Doleman, Elvin Bethea, Andre Tippett, Curly Culp, Shawn Merriman, Len Ford, Art Donovan, Julius Peppers, Simeon Rice, Mike Haynes, Paul Krause, Lem Barney, Roger Wehrli, Lester Hayes, Jack Christiansen, Aeneas Williams, Ed Reed, Art Monk, Isaac Bruce, and Dick Anderson

Top 100 Football Players of All-Time (list only)

1) Jerry Rice
2) Jim Brown
3) Lawrence Taylor
4) Joe Montana
5) Johnny Unitas
6) Reggie White
7) Emmitt Smith
8) Deacon Jones
9) Don Hutson
10) Bob Lilly
11) Dick Butkus
12) Otto Graham
13) Barry Sanders
14) Tom Brady
15) Anthony Munoz
16) Joe Greene
17)Marion Motley
18) Sammy Baugh
19) Brett Favre
20). Steve Young
21) Ray Lewis
22) Walter Payton
23) Gino Marchetti
24) Peyton Manning
25) Dick “Night Train” Lane
26) Jack Lambert
27) John Elway
28) Ronnie Lott
29) Dan Marino
30) John Hannah
31) Alan Page
32) Deion Sanders
33) LaDanian Tomlinson
34) Roger Staubach
35) Forrest Gregg
36) Bronco Nagurski
37) Ray Nitschke
38) Marshall Faulk
39) Earl Campbell
40) Marvin Harrison
41) Larry Allen
42) Mel Blount
43) Lance Alworth
44) Bruce Smith
45) Willie Lanier
46) Jim Parker
47) Merlin Olsen
48) Herb Adderley
49) Mike Singletary
50) Terrell Owens
51) Joe Schmidt
52). Rod Woodson
53). Randy Moss
54). Derrick Brooks
55) Bruce Matthews
56). Sid Luckman
57). Eric Dickerson
58). Bart Starr
59). Chuck Bednarik
60). Fran Tarkenton
61). Steve Van Buren
62). Jonathan Ogden
63). Ken Houston
64). Randy White
65). Michael Strahan
66). Ted Hendricks
67). Mel Hein
68). Junior Seau
69). Jack Ham
70). Emlen Tunnell
71). Mike Webster
72). Warren Sapp
73). Willie Brown
74). Bobby Layne
75). Terry Bradshaw
76). Derrick Thomas
77). Roosevelt Brown
78). Franco Harris
79). Willie Wood
80). Gene Upshaw
81). Gale Sayers
82). Norm Van Brocklin
83). Tony Gonzalez
84). Bobby Bell
85). Will Shields
86). O.J. Simpson
87). Champ Bailey
88). Mel Renfro
89). Shannon Sharpe
90). Bill George
91). Y.A. Tittle
92). Randall McDaniel
93). Yale Lary
94). Larry Wilson
95). Darrell Green
96). Sam Huff
97). Torry Holt
98). Kellen Winslow
99). Willie Roaf
100). Raymond Berry

Top 100 Basketball Players of All-Time

 

Two years ago, I put together the 50 best players in history for each of the four major sports. That was a daunting and time consuming task but I was fairly happy with the results. As time moved along, it started to bother me more and more that I didn’t have a “top 100” so I’ve spent the last six months or so working on that. For the most part, the players rated in my original “top 50″ stayed in the same spots with a few exceptions. There was limited player movement that mostly involved active players. Also, there were a few instances where a player moved into the top 50 who was previously left out two years ago.

Please read the following before moving on to the list…

1). It is important to know why and how I chose to rate active players. A list like this isn’t nearly as fun or accurate if we just pretend active players don’t exist. The way I rated active players is simple. I considered their accomplishments up to this point and then assumed a healthy, reasonable, finish to their careers.

2). None of the rankings are arbitrary or without multiple rationalizations. If you would like a clarification, feel free to ask. I’d be happy to rationalize a ranking. If I agree with an objection, then I’ll be happy to make a change.

3). It is not uncommon for sports fans to discount current players with respect to history because a). present-day players don’t have the luxury of accumulating gaudy statistics and award-counts against weak competition and b). their most cherished memories are from childhood so there is an inherent preference towards players from earlier generations. I can understand why the overrating occurs but, at the same time, I’m not going to do it here.

4). These lists are based on the NBA, NHL, MLB, and NFL. I would love to have the insight to include players from international leagues. The same goes for the Negro Leagues. Instead of pretending to know more than I do, I only chose to rate players who did their work in the four major leagues.

5). The list is based on statistics through December ’07.

6). First and last names for each player have different links. First names link to Wikipedia-entries and last names link to career-stats.

7). For more information, click here. It’s my criterion from the original “Top 50.” It’s basically the same with more boring detail.

Top 100 Basketball Players of All-Time

1) Michael Jordan

There isn’t a doubt in my mind that Michael Jordan is the best basketball player in NBA history. He was so good that he didn’t win MVP awards because of it. People got tired of voting for him so they started passing the award around to other NBA stars. In all, Jordan won six NBA Championships, six Finals MVPs, five NBA MVPs, and three All Star game MVPs. He was even selected to nine first team All-Defensive teams. Had Jordan not retired for two years the first time around, his career accomplishments would have been even more ludicrous. He almost surely would have won two more NBA Championships as well as two additional MVP awards. Luckily for the Houston Rockets, that never happened. Even with multiple retirements, Jordan is easily the best player in NBA history.

2) Kareem Abdul-Jabbar

I always knew Kareem was good. You don’t hold the record for most points in NBA history by being average. What I didn’t know was just how good he was. I only got to see the “bald” portion of his career. In his prime, Kareem was unstoppable. He amassed six MVP awards (most all-time), six NBA Championships, two Finals MVPs, and 19 All-Star appearances (most all-time). His patented “skyhook” was an unblockable weapon. His defensive skills earned him five selections to the First Team All-Defense. His all-around skills made him the perfect big man for Pat Riley’s up-tempo offense. Kareem has the most First-Team All-NBA selections of any center in history. He has the most All-NBA (first, second, and third) selections of any player in history. He finished in the top five of the NBA MVP voting 15 times. No player has even come close to that.

3) Magic Johnson

Magic’s greatness can be quantified by citing a lot of statistics. But, I think the single most compelling evidence of his greatness is that there hasn’t been a player since who has been able to do the things he did. He was a 6’8 point guard who could run the break, drive to the hole, rebound and post-up. His excellence produced five NBA Championships and three MVPs. He accomplished all of that despite the fact that his career ended at 31 years of age. One can only imagine what he could have done with five-to-ten more years added to his career. Magic holds a slight edge over Shaq in a number of categories. He holds a 5-4 Championship advantage, a 9-8 All-NBA First Team advantage, a 9-8 advantage in top-5 MVP finishes, and a 3-1 MVP advantage (although both won three Finals MVPs). Magic is 6th on the all-time Wins Shares Above Average-list. Shaq is 7th. Plus, as a 6’8 point guard, Magic is one of the few players in NBA history who can claim a size advantage relative to his position on par with Shaq’s.

4) Shaquille O’Neal

I realize that this won’t be a popular placement. I’ve actually thought about moving Shaq down the list simply to make this list “look” more accurate. But, if I did that, it wouldn’t be my list. Shaq is the most unstoppable force in NBA history. His size and athleticism transcend all eras. There are a number of reasons why he won’t be rated this highly by most but few, if any, have anything to do with the fact that he dominated the most talented and physically demanding era in NBA history. To be honest, I can’t say that I’m thrilled to have Shaq at #4. The majority of his skills are below average. He can’t shoot free throws. He can’t shoot outside of eight feet. He can’t drive to the rim. The things he can’t do significantly outweigh the things he can. His game isn’t well-rounded by any means. However, the one thing that he has going for him makes him the most unstoppable force in NBA history. No player has ever been able to successfully guard Shaq straight up. In fact, defensive ploys such as the “hack-a-Shaq” were used to avoid having to play defense against him. Shaq benefits from being the biggest man to ever play the game. He has received the benefit of doubt on thousands of uncalled offensive fouls due to his “size”. Right or wrong, Shaq’s size has allowed him to get away with liberties. Those liberties, combined with his size and athleticism make him un-guardable. Wilt Chamberlain and Bill Russell had similar success but the difference is that Shaq would have bullied Chamberlain and Russell, too. Shaq is bigger and stronger than Wilt. And, considering Shaq and Wilt shared virtually the same skill-set, Shaq gets the advantage. He is bigger and stronger and dominated in a more difficult era. The average frontcourt player in Wilt’s day was 6’7–or Rip Hamilton. Shaq has three NBA Finals MVPs. Only Michael Jordan has more. He has been selected to 14 NBA All-Star games. Only Kareem has more. Shaq has eight First Team All-NBA selections. Only Kareem has more among centers. He has a career shooting percentage of 58%. Only Artis Gilmore was better. By the time he retires, Shaq will have played in more playoff games than anyone in NBA history other than Kareem and Robert Horry. He has the second best PER (Player Efficiency Rating) in NBA history behind Michael Jordan. PER measures everything that a player contributes both positive and negative. Shaq took his teams to the playoffs in 15 of his 16 seasons including nine Conference Finals appearances, six Finals appearances, and four NBA Championships. For all his greatness, Wilt won two Championships in a mediocre era. If you were building a team right now and you could choose any player in NBA history—in their prime—Jordan would probably be your first choice and Shaq would probably be the second choice even ahead of Kareem and Magic. Wilt and Russell could not handle Shaq in the post and they would have a difficult time scoring on him in the post as well. Differences aside, no reasonable list should have Shaq rated any lower than #7.

5) Wilt Chamberlain

More than a few people probably think that Wilt Chamberlain is the greatest NBA player of all-time. I can respect that viewpoint. I just don’t agree with it. He dominated the competition like nobody before or after him. There are a number of reasons why I can’t rate Chamberlain higher than fifth. First, Jordan, Kareem, and Magic just have better resumes. Second, his competition wasn’t anywhere near what Shaq had to play against. There is no way to quantify the differences in competition-levels but Chamberlain most likely wouldn’t have fared as well as Shaq had he played in his era. Keep in mind that Chamberlain was essentially Dwight Howard (big, strong, lean, athletic player without much of a game outside of 8’) playing in the 60s and 70s. Howard gives us a glimpse of what Wilt might be like if he played today. He’s good but he certainly isn’t scoring 100 points or grabbing 55 rebounds in a game. Lastly, Shaq was the prototype for his position. Shaq was bigger, stronger, and more explosive than Chamberlain. Shaq also won twice as many titles in a vastly more difficult era. As for a Chamberlain/Russell comparison, I give the edge to Wilt. Bill Simmons (“The Sports Guy”) recently said that revisionist history has caused Chamberlain to be rated higher than Bill Russell. He also said that back when both men were playing, it was common knowledge that Russell was the better player. If that is the case, then why was Wilt selected to the First Team All-NBA ahead of Russell in seven of the nine seasons that they played together? Also, Chamberlain was 7’1 while Russell was only 6’9. That is a significant difference in height. A match-up like that in the NBA today would be called a “mismatch.” The extra four inches are likely the reason Russell wasn’t able to match Chamberlain’s dominance offensively in an era plagued by 6’7 post-players. The edge goes to Chamberlain.

6) Bill Russell

I am a big fan of taking into consideration championships when analyzing a career. That’s not to say that a player who never won a championship can’t be better than a player who did win a championship. Nobody, in any sport, has won more championships than Bill Russell. He is undoubtedly one of the greatest players to ever play the game. Unfortunately, I can’t justify rating him above the players ahead of him on this list. Winning that many championships takes a good amount of skill and an absurd amount of good fortune. Russell played along side Bob Cousy and John Havlicek who are among the top 50 NBA players of all-time. He also had the “Chamberlain factor” of matching up against much weaker competition than Shaq and Kareem. Russell was awesome. I almost feel like I need to justify ranking him only 6th all-time. Eleven championships will do that to you. He was great, but he was vastly inferior offensively to the players above him on the list. His Player Efficiency Rating (PER) is also, by far, the lowest of any player that I have rated in the top 20.

7) Tim Duncan

Duncan seems to be slowing down. He is still relatively young. If he can pick things up a bit, he could easily reach the top five. His career accomplishments already stand up pretty good to Magic and Bird. Duncan has won four NBA Championships, two MVPs, and three NBA Finals MVPs. He has been equally good on both offense and defense. He has been selected first team All-Defense eight of his eleven seasons. His PER is the 7th best in NBA history.

8) Larry Bird

I went into the Magic/Bird comparison with an open mind. After looking over everything seemingly a million times and recalling what I saw from each personally, I can’t rate Bird higher than Magic. They both won three MVPs but Magic won more NBA Championships (5-3) and more NBA Finals MVPs (3-2). Magic was also a more dynamic player with his ability to play point guard at 6’8. Regardless of his standing behind Magic, I do not feel bad about ranking Bird 8th all-time.

9) Oscar Robertson

I never had the luxury of seeing Robertson play as I’m sure most people haven’t. But, his numbers speak volumes. He is the only player in NBA history to average a triple-double over an entire season. He barely missed in four other seasons with assist averages of 9.7 and 9.5 and rebound averages of 9.9 and 9.0. If you’re a “rounder”, then that’s four seasons of averaging a triple-double. His team success doesn’t match that of some of the other greats but he did manage to win an NBA Championship and an MVP.

10) Karl Malone

If this list was “championship or bust” then Karl Malone would be out. Malone had a remarkable career that famously produced zero championships. He came close twice but was upended by Michael Jordan’s Bulls both times. Thanks to Jordan, there were a lot of great players who never won an NBA Championship including Charles Barkley, Dominique Wilkins, and Patrick Ewing. Malone came close but it never happened. He ranks second on the all-time scoring list behind Kareem. He finished in the top five of the MVP Voting nine times. He was selected to 14 All-Star games which is the second most in NBA history behind Kareem. He won two MVPs and was selected to the All-NBA first team a league record 11 times. That last statistic is why Malone got the nod over the players just below him including Hakeem. A lot of people think Hakeem had the better career but the comparison isn’t that close. Malone holds the edge in First Team All-NBA selections (11-6), Top Ten MVP finishes (14-10), Top Three MVP finishes (5-2), MVPs (2-1), and All-Star appearances (14-12). Malone played at least 80 games in 17 of his 19 seasons. Hakeem did it five times. The only edge Hakeem has is the two Championships that Michael Jordan gift-wrapped for him. I’m not going to hold that against Malone.

11) Kobe Bryant

Where Kobe winds up on this list remains to be seen. He could end up in the top five or stay right where he is at. It all depends on whether he can bring the Lakers back to Championship-glory without Shaq. As it stands now, Bryant’s career has been spectacular. Although, there is no question that his career was greatly enhanced by Shaq’s presence. Together they won three-straight NBA Championships. Apart, Shaq has a title and Kobe does not. Kobe’s stellar combination of offensive and defensive brilliance is rarely seen in the NBA. In fact, the only guard that I can recall that played both sides as well is Michael Jordan. Kobe finally has an MVP under his belt which will help his profile. He needs to start piling up the individual hardware if he is going to make a move into the top ten. A few Finals MVPs wouldn’t hurt. Jordan has six. Kobe has zero.

12) Hakeem Olajuwon

I view Hakeem Olajuwon on two different fronts. First, I think he might have been the most “skilled” center who has ever played. His repertoire of offensive moves was second-to-none. He was superb on defense and was an excellent passer. His domination of a 23-year old Shaq (and everyone else) in the 1995 NBA Championship was shocking. However, I do think that Hakeem’s legacy was greatly enhanced by the first retirement of Michael Jordan. Because of Jordan’s retirement, Hakeem managed to finally win an NBA Championship (back-to-back) as well as winning an MVP and two NBA Finals MVPs. Hakeem was a fantastic player but he was definitely in the right place at the right time. Had Jordan retired two seasons later, Karl Malone and John Stockton would have likely gotten those two rings. Hakeem’s two Championships, two Finals MVP and NBA MVP all came with Jordan out of the league. Malone’s best teams were with Jordan in the league. That’s not a knock on Hakeem. It’s just important to acknowledge that in a comparison with Malone.

13) Julius Erving

Based on his NBA numbers alone, Dr. J probably doesn’t deserve to be rated this high. However, he was so dominant in the ABA that it would be a shame to penalize him for coming from the wrong league. Erving won three MVP’s in the ABA which is an impressive feat but shouldn’t be confused with winning an NBA MVP where the competition was second-to-none. Erving won two ABA Championships and one NBA Championship. It’s not like his NBA-career was second-rate, either. He made 11 All-Star teams. He was selected First Team All-NBA five times. He finished in the top five of the MVP Voting five times and won the MVP in ’81.

14) Moses Malone

Moses Malone’s career was a lot like Kareem Abdul-Jabbar’s. Few played better for longer. Malone averaged a double-double for 15 straight seasons which is more than Russell, Chamberlain and Abdul-Jabbar. All told, Malone collected three MVPs, an NBA Championship and an NBA Finals MVP.

15) David Robinson

David Robinson was my favorite player growing up. I had several posters of “The Admiral” up in my room. He was equally smart as he was exceptional on the court. He single-handedly rejuvenated the San Antonio Spurs organization. The Spurs improved an astounding 35 games from the previous season in Robinson’s first year. He led the Spurs to two NBA Championships. He also won an MVP and a Defensive Player of the Year award. He finished in the top three of the MVP Voting five times. He is second all-time in Wins Shares Above Average (WSAA) and third all-time in PER. The most amazing stat that anyone could ever cite about Robinson is that in his 14 seasons, he only accounted for 11 Loss Shares (LS). That number is unfathomable. Antoine Walker accounted for 42 alone in 2005. He missed three seasons to start his career while serving his commitment in the Navy. Had Robinson not missed that time, his resume would have been even more impressive.

16) Bob Pettit

I don’t know much about Bob Pettit but what I do know is that he was awesome. He won two MVPs while being selected to the All-NBA first team ten times (second most all-time). His PER was through the roof for a player from his time. He helped lead his team to the NBA Championship in 1958 as well as Finals-appearances in 1957, 1960 and 1961. He is the only player in NBA history to average more than 20 points in every season that he played.

17) Kevin Garnett

KG rates higher than Barkley simply because I would take KG in his prime over Barkley. Both were saddled with average teammates throughout their careers. Both won an MVP award. Both were overshadowed by better players at the same position (Malone for Barkley and Duncan for KG). KG’s career also resembles Elgin Baylor’s. Both had awesome stats for teams that never had much of a shot at winning an NBA Championship. Both were overshadowed by other larger than life stars (Shaq and Wilt). KG has a second lease on life in the NBA with Boston where he has already added a Defensive Player of the Year award to his trophy case. A Championship might move him up a bit but it’ll take more than one to make a significant movement.

18) Charles Barkley

I thought Malone and Charles Barkley would have been harder to differentiate but I think the difference between the two is bigger than the difference between Magic and Bird by a large margin. As I stated above, Malone was selected First Team All-NBA 11 times. Barkley, playing the same position at the same time, only made the First Team five times. Malone won two MVPs and reached the NBA Finals twice. Barkley won one MVP and reached the NBA Finals once. Barkley was fantastic. He was one of my favorite players to watch when I was younger. I still remember watching his 56-point performance in the 1994 NBA playoffs. But, it’s tough to argue he should be rated higher.

19) George Mikan

I had a rough time rating George Mikan. The fundamental question that I tried to answer was whether or not Mikan was as good as his numbers and legend indicate or whether his vast size contributed to most of his dominance. I think the answer is a mixture of both but I leaned towards Mikan being that good. There is no question that he had a huge advantage by being bigger and taller than everyone else. Size counts for a lot. However, the fact that nobody had ever been that big and that skillful before means Mikan had something special. Nobody had ever seen that level of agility from a man that size. He was the predecessor to Wilt, Russell, and Kareem. His skills and athleticism probably wouldn’t match up well against those players but he was no doubt the best of his time.

20) Jerry West

Jerry West was a fantastic basketball player. He is literally the face of the NBA as he is the silhouette portrayed on the league’s logo. West was a first team All-NBA selection ten times (second all-time). He had the luxury of playing with Wilt Chamberlain and Elgin Baylor during his career. That may be the greatest collection of talent on one team the league has ever seen. West was also a stellar defensive player being named first team All-Defense four times. West didn’t win an MVP award for the same reasons Baylor didn’t. Chamberlain and Russell made it virtually impossible for anyone else in that era to win the award.

21) LeBron James

LeBron James is the closest thing to Magic Johnson that the league has seen since Magic retired. Unlike most “pie in the sky” comparisons, I actually think LeBron will end up being better than Magic. In fact, I think LeBron has the potential to end up being the best player the league has ever seen. He is physically dominant at the ripe age of 23. At 6’9, LeBron can do everything Magic could do and more. He is bigger and stronger than Magic already. Barring a career-ending injury, LeBron will dominate the NBA like few have ever seen.

22) Bob Cousy

Bob Cousy is a tough player to rate because he literally played on an All-Star team his entire career. When he wasn’t playing with Bill Russell and Sam Jones, it was Bill Sharman and John Havlicek. Cousy played for six NBA Championship teams. He also won an MVP award and was selected to the All-NBA first team 10 times (second all-time). His PER is the second lowest (Russell is the only one lower) of anyone I have rated in the top 25. I can only guess that Cousy’s career was greatly enhanced by the talent around him. That’s not meant to discredit his abilities. Being the 22nd best player in NBA history is nothing to scoff at. I just wanted to make it clear why he wasn’t rated higher.

23) Elgin Baylor

Elgin Baylor is the only player besides LeBron in my top 40 (George Mikan played before MVPs were handed out) not to have won an MVP award. In a league where MVP awards are “measuring sticks” for greatness, that doesn’t sound too impressive. However, it’s important to remember that during Baylor’s playing career (1959-1972) Bill Russell won four MVPs, Wilt Chamberlain won four MVPs, and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar won two MVPs. Those three players just happen to be rated in my top six of all-time. Baylor’s statistics are eye-popping. Over his career, he averaged 27.4 points and 14 rebounds per game. He was selected first-team All-NBA ten times which is the second best mark in NBA history behind Karl Malone. He also played for eight teams that went to the NBA Finals. Baylor’s record in the Finals? 0-8!

24) Dolph Schayes

Dolph Schayes was one of the early “greats”. When he retired, he was the all-time leading scorer in NBA history. The main reason that I can’t justify ranking him higher is that he was only selected to six All-NBA First Teams in 15 seasons in an era when the talent around the league was relatively thin. He was a member of an NBA Championship-team but never won an MVP.

25) Rick Barry

Rick Barry was a great “scorer”. As far as career accomplishments go, he fell just short of Jerry West in just about every measurable statistic.

26) George Gervin

I can’t make a great case for Barry or George Gervin in a straight-up comparison. Their numbers are eerily similar and frustratingly indiscernible. However, I do think there is a big discrepancy in a statistic that puts Barry just ahead of Gervin. Both players played four seasons in the ABA and ten seasons in the NBA. In those seasons, Barry was selected to the All-League First Team nine times while Gervin only managed five selections. In a tight comparison that is enough to give the edge to Barry.

27) Dirk Nowitzki

Dirk takes a lot of heat. Some of it might be deserved but most of it is not. Dirk’s game is very specific. It’s not fair to criticize him for being something he isn’t. He is a skilled, big-man who tries to bang whenever possible. He is limited by his thin-frame. His mid-range jumper is his go-to shot. He can’t dominate games like Shaq, Tim Duncan, LeBron, or Kobe because he can’t get to the rim like those players. However, Dirk is unquestionably one of the best players in NBA history. He has been selected First Team All-NBA three times. He has finished in the top three of the MVP Voting three times. He won the MVP in 2007. He turned the Mavs into a juggernaut. His supporting cast featured nothing more than a bunch of upper-echelon role players. Dirk was the rock that helped the Mavs to eight-consecutive 50+ win seasons including three 60-win seasons and one of the best regular season win totals in NBA history (67). Dirk led the Mavs to the brink of the NBA Championship in ’06 but came up short to Shaq and the Miami Heat. Dirk’s Win Shares Above Average, Wins Shares, and Player Efficiency Rating are among the best in NBA history. Those numbers are tough to ignore.

28) John Havlicek

Havlicek probably gets rated a little higher than this on most Top 50-lists but I think that’s because of his good fortune of playing with Bill Russell. Havlicek has the lowest PER of any player in my top 45. He only made four All-NBA first teams in 16 seasons. Those are the reasons why I couldn’t have rated him higher. However, he was also selected to seven All-NBA Second Teams, five First Team All-NBA defense and played for eight NBA Championship teams. His legend probably precedes his resume slightly but he undoubtedly had a stellar career.

29) John Stockton

While it may seem obvious to some, I am not 100% certain as to who was more pivotal for the Utah Jazz; Karl Malone or John Stockton? Maybe it’s a tie. Most summaries of either player won’t go a paragraph without bringing up the other player. I didn’t even make it one sentence. Stockton was the “prototypical” point guard. He was often considered a “dirty” player for his aggressive play. He was quite possibly the greatest passer the league has ever seen. He was deadly from behind the arc. I have suspicions that Stockton was better than Cousy. The only difference is that Cousy won an MVP and six NBA Titles while Stockton came up empty in both.

30) Walt Frazier

If anything, I may have overrated Frazier just a tad but I am comfortable with placing him at #30. Frazier was a fantastic two-way guard. He was selected to the First Team All-Defense seven times and First Team All-NBA four times. He also helped lead the New York Knicks to two NBA Championships. There were betters players on offense and better players on defense but there weren’t many who had his level of proficiency on both ends.

31) Neil Johnston

I had a difficult time separating Dolph Schayes and Neil Johnston from one another. Schayes only got the edge on Johnston because of his longevity. Johnston only played eight seasons to Schayes’ 15. Although Johnston has the better PER of the two, Schayes’ PER would have been better had he only played eight seasons like Johnston.

32) Isiah Thomas

Out of all of the NBA greats, Isiah Thomas probably has the biggest fluctuation in perception from one person to the next. Some people think he was the greatest player six feet or under to ever play the game. Others think he tarnished the game of basketball by bringing a more physical style of play to the court as a member of the “Bad Boys”. Michael Jordan even went as far as to keep him off of the 1992 Dream Team. His image may not be the best but there is no doubting his dominance on the basketball court. He led the Pistons to two NBA Championships beating some of the great players the league had ever seen including Michael Jordan, Magic Johnson, and Larry Bird. He was a highly proficient shooter who took the ball to the hole with a big-man’s ferocity. His PER isn’t all that impressive which is one of the reasons why I can’t rate him higher but few players had his drive and determination to go along with superior talent.

33) Steve Nash

If there’s any pick that’s going to lead to the questioning of my credibility besides Shaq at #4, it might be this one. Then again, I think people know how good Nash is. He is one of only nine players to win back-to-back MVP awards. The other eight are in my top 15. Nash’s arrival in Phoenix in 2005 led to a 33-game improvement over the previous season. He is one of the great fast-break point guards in NBA history. Over his career he has shot over 43% from three point range and 90% from the free throw line. There isn’t a team in the NBA that Nash couldn’t lead to the playoffs. He is the ultimate team player in the sense that he makes everyone better. It’s not a coincidence that players seem to have career-years when they become his teammate.

34) Allen Iverson

I could see someone rating Iverson anywhere from the top 15 to outside of the top 50. His enigmatic persona and style of play are hard to put a finger on. He had the misfortune of playing for untalented teams throughout his career. As a result, he took it upon himself to shoot the ball often. The results on the stat sheet have been nothing short of impressive. The results on the court have been a different story. The question still remains as to whether a team can win a championship with Iverson leading the way. He hasn’t had as much of a chance to play “team” basketball as some of the other greats from his era. He was a tough match-up for anyone but it’s much easier to play defense against one guy than five. Iverson did win an MVP award and has a career average of 28.0 points per game which is third on the all-time list behind only Michael Jordan and Wilt Chamberlain.

35) Elvin Hayes

Hayes averaged a double-double for thirteen-straight seasons. It would have been 16-straight had he not averaged 9.9 rebounds per game in 1982. He was a solid player throughout his entire career but he was never the best. Hayes did his best work in the playoffs averaging a double-double in every postseason that he played in. He led his teams to three NBA Finals and one NBA Championship. His PER is the third worst of the top 50 which is one of the reasons I can’t rate him much higher.

36) Bill Sharman

Sharman teamed with Cousy to form a legendary backcourt. Cousy’s production was better across the board and his accolades trumped Sharman’s by a considerable amount. Depending on how much one contributes Sharman’s success to being teamed with Russell and Cousy, I can understand rating him lower. However, he was selected to four All-NBA First Teams and three Second Teams. So, he was certainly accomplished in his own right.

37) Scottie Pippen

Pippen was so hard to rate that I had him outside of the top 50 for the majority of the ranking process. I can fully understand someone not wanting to include him in the top 50. There is no question that–more than any other player–his career was enhanced by the good fortune of playing with a superstar. While Jordan garnered a ton of individual success early in his career, it wasn’t until Pippen became an effective all-around force that the Bulls started winning. Pippen had a deadly jump shot and the ability to take the ball to the rim at will. He was also one of the elite defensive players in the league. He made eight All-Defense First Teams. Only Gary Payton and Michael Jordan had more. Speaking of which…

38) Gary Payton

I had similar problems rating Gary Payton but for different reasons. Payton looked like a “washed up” veteran at the end of his career. I started to wonder whether or not he was a bit overrated. But, I came to my senses. Payton looked like a “washed up” veteran because he was one. Before he got old (as all players do), he was the best two-way point guard in the NBA for more than a decade. During his prime, Payton averaged over 20 points and eight assists per game. He also made nine All-Defense First Teams which is the most all-time. Payton is the only player in NBA history to lead the NBA in steals, assists, and three-point field goals made. Payton finished in the top six of the MVP Voting six times.

39) Jerry Lucas

It is easy to overlook deserving players by simply focusing on statistics and career length. I made it a point to look up player reputations and the impact players had on the league to get a better understanding of how good they actually were. Lucas deserves to be in the top 50 and I may have underrated him at #39. Lucas averaged over 20 rebounds in two different seasons. Only four players in NBA history ever accomplished that in even one season. Lucas was chosen as an All-NBA First-Teamer three times in his career. He ranks fourth on the all-time list in rebounds per game. He didn’t receive the same amount of attention as Chamberlain and Russell but he was almost as good.

40) Willis Reed

Willis Reed may have had the most productive season in sports history in 1970. He was the All-Star game MVP. He was the regular season MVP. He was the playoff MVP. He was also named First Team All-NBA and First Team All-Defense. That is also the same season in which he made his heroic mid-game return to lead the Knicks to the NBA Championship in game 7 of the Finals. He was also the NBA Finals MVP in 1973. Reed averaged 19 points and 13 rebounds over his career.

41) Tiny Archibald

I found it incredibly difficult to differentiate between the last ten players who made the top 50 and the first ten players who didn’t make it. Archibald made the All-NBA First Team three times. Odds are that if a guy is the best player at his position for three seasons in his career, then he was probably one of the best 50 players of all-time. Although, there are a few with three First Team-selections who didn’t make the top 50.

42) Bob McAdoo

McAdoo made one All-NBA First Team and one Second Team in 14 seasons. That is one of the lowest totals of any of the 50 players. But, from 1974-1977 McAdoo had one of the greatest four-season stretches in league history highlighted by an MVP award in 1975. He also finished runner-up in the MVP Voting twice during that stretch. McAdoo became a very good sixth man near the end of his career winning two NBA Championships with the Lakers.

43) Dominique Wilkins

Like a few of the guys on this list, I didn’t initially include Dominique Wilkins in the top 50. Then, I came to my senses. ‘Nique might deserve to be rated higher than this but his career is not much different than Vince Carter’s and Carter isn’t near the top 50. In short, ‘Nique was a fantastic offensive player who never had team success, never won individual awards, and was overshadowed by some of the all-time greats like Michael Jordan, Magic Johnson and Larry Bird to name a few.

44) Clyde Drexler

If a great player plays the same position at the same time as Michael Jordan, does anyone notice? Not really. Drexler is probably one of the least known stars in NBA history. Playing in Portland didn’t help his cause much but that didn’t have near the impact as playing in Jordan’s era. Let’s just say that if a shooting guard was going to win the MVP during Drexler’s career it wasn’t going to be Drexler. His career numbers are impressive. Not coincidentally, Drexler was finally able to win an NBA Championship when Michael Jordan retired. Drexler was a 10-time All-Star who led three teams to the NBA Finals. He also had an impressive PER at 21.4.

45). Jason Kidd

I like Kidd. I like the way he handles his business on the court. But, that doesn’t mean I don’t think he is overrated by some. Point guards don’t have to score a lot so it’s not a big deal if they don’t score a lot of points. However, it is a really big deal if they can’t shoot. Kidd is a terrible shooter. He is a career 33% three-point shooter which is pretty bad in itself. What’s worse is that he shoots 40% from the field. That is simply atrocious. A great player cannot shoot that poorly. Now, Kidd is a tremendously skilled point guard. He has excellent vision. He runs the break perfectly. He has a stocky-frame that he uses to finish. He is an above-average defender. Those attributes make him a very good player. Kidd has made the First Team All-NBA five times and First Team All-Defense four times. He came close to winning an MVP in 2002 but lost out to Tim Duncan. Kidd makes bad teams better. He did that in Phoenix and New Jersey. What he doesn’t do is make good teams great. There is no way Kidd can touch Gary Payton’s accomplishments. Payton finished First Team All-Defense nine times, First Team All-NBA twice and Second Team All-NBA five times. Payton shot 47% from the field. In his prime years, Payton averaged 22 points and eight assists per game. Kidd averaged 15 and 10 over his prime years. Payton finished in the top six of the MVP Voting six times. Kidd did it twice. My point with the Payton/Kidd comparison isn’t to rip on Kidd. It’s to show how Kidd stacks up against another great point guard who will undoubtedly be underrated more and more as time goes on. As for a Kidd/Nash comparison, all I can say is that Nash has won two MVPs with a better PER and has averaged 18 and 11 over the past four seasons. Kidd has never done that for even one season. So, my conclusion is that Kidd is a very good basketball player but that’s it.

46) Paul Arizin

Arizin was one of the great early-NBA players. He made three All-NBA First Teams. He averaged 23 points and eight rebounds over his career and led his team to an NBA Championship in 1956. He is probably the least accomplished of the 50’s greats (behind Mikan, Johnston, Pettit, Schayes, Bill Sharman and Bob Cousy) which is why he’s rated this low.

47). Dave Cowens

I would not have wanted to play against Cowens in the post. Darryl Dawkins says that Cowens was the dirtiest player he had ever seen and I don’t doubt it. Cowens averaged 18 points and 14 rebounds per game throughout his career. That is just unheard of in today’s game. He won the MVP in ’73 when he averaged 21 and 16. He also had second, third, and fourth place finishes in MVP Voting. Despite finishing in the top four in the MVP race four times and winning once, Cowens never made First Team All-NBA. That really doesn’t make any sense but he managed three Second Team honors. Cowens also helped the Celtics to two NBA Championships.

48). Tracy McGrady

T-Mac is an incredible basketball player. Based on talent, he should rank in the top 20. There is no doubt in my mind that he is considerably more talented than Dominique Wilkins, Scottie Pippen, and Clyde Drexler. T-Mac hasn’t reached his potential and I’m not sure he ever will. He lacks the infamous “killer instinct” that makes Kobe Bryant so great. McGrady doesn’t play with the same intensity on defense. He settles for too many jumpers on offense when everyone knows he can get to the rim anytime he wants. His malaised-attitude has been the primary culprit in never winning a playoff series. Still he has been selected First Team All-NBA twice and Second Team three times. When healthy, he is always a bet to finish among the top eight in the MVP Voting. He has been a part of a number of historically significant moments. He led the Houston Rockets to the second longest winning streak in NBA history at 22 games. He once scored 13 points in 33 seconds. He has led the league in scoring twice and has career averages of 22 points, 6 rebounds and 5 assists per game.

49) Patrick Ewing

Ewing is one of those stars who had the misfortune of playing at the same time as Michael Jordan. I remember some of his dominating performances in the playoffs against the Pistons. He was one of the top two centers in the NBA in the late 80’s/early 90’s but he was never able to lead his team to a championship or win an MVP.

50) Dwyane Wade

Even though Wade is considered by most to be one of the best players in the NBA, I think he is vastly underrated. He gets to the rim better than any player I have ever seen and that’s saying something. Any coach who doesn’t give Wade the ball every possession over the last five minutes in a close game should be fired. When Wade takes the ball to the rim late in a game, he will either make it or get fouled. If he can stay healthy, Wade’s individual numbers will skyrocket without Shaq. He is as physically gifted as any player in the league.

51). Billy Cunningham

Cunningham made the First Team All-NBA three times. He averaged 20+ points, 10+ rebounds, and 4+ assists. He is one of only five players in NBA history to accomplish that feat over a career (Bird, Baylor, KG, and Chamberlain are the other four). Over his best five seasons, Cunningham averaged 23 points and 12 rebounds.

52). Artis Gilmore

Gilmore is one of the most underrated players in NBA history. In fact, he is so underrated that I think I have actually underrated him on my own list. Gilmore spent his first five seasons in the ABA where he absolutely destroyed the league. He averaged 23 points and 17 rebounds over those five seasons. During his time in the ABA, Gilmore won the MVP, All-Star MVP, and Playoff MVP. Gilmore made the leap to the NBA at the age of 27. Over his NBA career he averaged a double-double in eight seasons. Over 14 seasons in the NBA, Gilmore averaged 17 points, 10 rebounds and 2 blocks. He also had a phenomenal shooting % of .599 which is the best in NBA history. In what can only be described as ridiculous, Gilmore is not in the Basketball Hall of Fame. He made the NBA All-Star game six times. There is no question that he would’ve made the NBA All-Star during his five seasons in the ABA in which he played the best basketball of his career. That is the equivalent of 11 NBA All-Star games. There is no chance that another basketball player with 11 All-Star appearances would be kept out of the Hall of Fame. Gilmore deserves better.

53). Chris Webber

I find it laughable that the question, “Is Chris Webber a Hall-of-Famer?” was even asked when he announced his retirement. What’s even more laughable is that the first five TV personalities who answered the question said, “no.” Webber is one of only six players in NBA history to averaged 20+ points, 9+ rebounds, and 4+ assists. Webber was one of the most explosive players in NBA history. He took a lot of criticism for not getting the Sacramento Kings to the NBA Finals. People must have forgotten that once upon a team, Kobe Bryant and Shaquille O’Neal played for the Lakers. That is why the Kings never made it to the Finals. Was Webber as good as those two players? Of course, not. Nobody was. Webber was selected once to the First Team All NBA and three times to the Second Team. He finished in the top ten of the MVP Voting five consecutive seasons. There isn’t another player with Webber’s numbers whose Hall of Fame status would be questioned. It’s also important to remember that Webber—at least until his knees were shot—was always the best player on his team. He didn’t have the luxury of players like Kevin McHale or James Worthy who got to play with some of the greatest players in NBA history.

54). Wes Unseld

Unseld was the Jason Kidd of power forwards. What Kidd is to assists, Unseld was to rebounds. However, what Kidd is to points, Unseld also is to points. In fact, Unseld didn’t even average 10+ points during seven of his thirteen seasons. He was a monster on the boards, though, averaging 14 rebounds per game over his career. Unseld won the MVP in his rookie season and a Finals MVP nine years later. There is no question that Unseld had a tremendous impact on the NBA. Although, his career statistics and accolades do not measure up to the top 50 players. He only garnered one First Team All NBA selection and zero Second Team selections in thirteen years. Despite being recognized as a great defensive player, he never made a First or Second All-NBA Defensive team either.

55). Kevin McHale

McHale is an enigma. He is one of the greatest offensive post players of all-time. He also happens to be one of the greatest defensive post players of all-time. However, he only started more than 32 games four times in his career. He only made one First or Second All-NBA team. His career stats and honors don’t put him anywhere close to the other players in the top 60. But, he was an integral part in leading the Celtics to three NBA Titles in the 80s. He teamed with Larry Bird and Robert Parrish to form one of the greatest teams in NBA history.

56). Grant Hill

Even as a hobbled veteran who has undergone countless ankle procedures, Hill is a valuable contributor for the Phoenix Suns. Hill only managed to play just over 22 games per year from 2001-2006. Still, before all of the injuries, He was easily one of the five best players in the NBA. He was selected First Team All NBA once and Second Team four times. He finished in the top ten of the MVP Voting five consecutive seasons. Hill is one of the few players in NBA history to average 20 points, 9 rebounds, and 7 assists over an entire season. Had Hill managed an injury-free career, he would’ve easily finished in the top 30.

57) Nate Thurmond

In 12 of Thurmond’s 14 seasons, either Wilt Chamberlain, Bill Russell, or Kareem Abdul-Jabbar made First Team All-NBA at center. Thurmond averaged 15 rebounds per game throughout his career which is 5th on the all-time list. He was the first NBA player to record a quadruple-double. He is also one of three players to average 21 points and 22 rebounds per game over a two-year stretch (Chamberlain and Russell are obviously the other two). Thurmond didn’t put up the awesome offensive numbers like some of the other greats but few were better defensively. He finished in the top ten of the MVP Voting three times including a second-place finish to Chamberlain in ’67.

58). Dave Bing

Bing was a poor man’s George Gervin. He didn’t play nearly as long or garner as many league honors but he was a pretty good all-around basketball player. He was selected to the First Team All-NBA twice and finished in the top six of the MVP Voting three times. Bing was selected as one of the 50 Greatest Basketball Players of All-Time in 1996. It would be difficult to argue that he is still one of the 50 greatest players 12 years later but he certainly had a great career.

59). Lenny Wilkens

The problem I have with rating Wilkens is that he was never once selected to the First or Second All-NBA Team. He was selected as one of the 50 Greatest Players in NBA history in 1996 so clearly he was a very good player. I just have a hard time believing that a truly great player could play 15 seasons and never be selected to the All-NBA Team. Wilkens did make nine All-Star games and finished second in the MVP Voting in 1968. However, in 15 seasons, Wilkens only finished in the top 15 of the MVP Voting once. I may have overrated him. He will be one of the players who I revisit in the future.

60). Robert Parish

I only really got a chance to see Parish play near the end of his career during the Pistons/Celtics series’ of the late 80s. He was still pretty good at that time. Through the wonders of NBA TV, I have gotten a chance to see Parish in his younger days and he was very good. He only made the Second Team All-NBA once and also made a Third Team once. His career totals won’t blow you away but he was instrumental in leading Boston to three NBA Titles in the 80’s.

61). Joe Dumars

I think it’s possible for Joe-D to be overrated and underrated. His game wasn’t flashy but he was an extremely effective player on both sides of the ball. His jumper was lethal and nobody played Michael Jordan better defensively. Dumars was selected to the First Team All-Defense four times. He was an integral cog in Detroit’s back-to-back NBA Titles in ’89 and ’90. He also won the NBA Finals MVP in 1989. Still, he only managed one Second Team All-NBA honor and never finished better than 10th in the MVP Voting.

62). Ed Macauley

Macauley was a big-time player in the NBA’s formative days. He was selected to the All-NBA First Team three times and also garnered a Second Team selection. Macauley was the MVP of the NBA’s first All-Star game in 1951. Macauley’s St. Louis Hawks beat the Celtics in the 1958 Championship which ended up keeping the Celtics from a run of 10 consecutive titles. Instead, they had to settle for eight in a row. Of course, Macauley was slightly responsible for that streak since he was traded to St. Louis for Bill Russell. In his ten-year career, Macauley finished in the top 10 in scoring eight times. He also finished among the top ten in rebounds and assists a number of times.

63). Adrian Dantley

The NBA in the 80s was much different than it is now as Dantley and Alex English can attest to. They routinely averaged 30+ points per game and never even sniffed an MVP. In fact, Dantley only finished in the top 10 of the MVP Voting once. He did manage two Second Team All-NBA selections and six All Star game appearances. Dantley was drafted by the Buffalo Braves in their last season in the NBA. The franchise moved to LA to become the Clippers. I met Dantley in 1987 at a Foot Locker where he was signing autographs. My lasting impression of that encounter was that he looked like Lionel Ritchie. Unfortunately, his time in Detroit didn’t work out and he was shipped off to Dallas just months before the Pistons won the first of two NBA Championships. Dantley never won a title.

64). Bill Walton

Walton had one of the greatest runs in NBA history which included one of the greatest seasons in NBA history (’78). His career was somewhat equivalent to Sandy Koufax’s but not nearly as long. Walton was the premier player in the league for two years. He won the NBA Finals MVP in 1977 as he led the Trailblazers to the NBA Championship. He finished 2nd in the MVP Voting in ’77 and won the MVP in ’78. Walton only finished in the top 20 in the MVP Voting during those two seasons. His only two All-NBA selections were during those two seasons as well.

65) Hal Greer

Nobody outside of my top 30 had more combined first and second team All-NBA selections than Greer. Of course, none of his seven selections were actually of the First Team variety. Greer was one of the finest guards of the 60’s. He also teamed with Wilt Chamberlain to end the eight-year Championship run by the Boston Celtics.

66). Spencer Haywood

In his first year of professional basketball, Haywood averaged 30 points and 20 rebounds (!!!) per game in the ABA. He made the leap to the NBA in his second season and found success there as well. In his first four seasons in the NBA, Haywood averaged at least 20 points and 12 rebounds. He was selected First Team All-NBA twice and Second Team All-NBA two more times. He also finished in the top 10 of the MVP Voting twice.

67). Bernard King

King was the Cam Neely of the NBA. He didn’t play much but when he did, he was awesome. King only played in 70+ games seven times in 14 seasons. That doesn’t include the two seasons that he missed completely. He led the NBA in scoring in ’85 with a 33 ppg scoring average. He finished second in the MVP Voting in ’84. He was also selected to the First Team All-NBA twice and a Second Team once.

68). Alex English

English and Dantley had nearly identical careers. Both played from 1976-1991. Both were prolific scorers. Dantley finished in the top ten in scoring six times. English did it nine times. Despite their scoring prowess, neither player was a First Team All-NBA Selection. Neither player won a championship. English finished in the top ten of the MVP Voting twice. Dantley did it once. I gave Dantley the nod for two reasons. 1). His “Win Shares Above Average” is much better than English’s, and 2). Dantley had a much bigger gap between his Offensive Rating (points scored per 100 possessions) and Defensive Rating (points allowed per 100 possessions). Dantley scored 10 more points than he allowed per 100 possessions. English scored one more point than he allowed per 100 possessions.

69) Pete Maravich

I struggled with the question of whether to include “Pistol Pete” in the top 50 or not. He is the talk of legend by millions of people that never saw him play. I have no doubt that he was spectacular but his resume isn’t as impressive as most of the players on the list. Maravich only played ten seasons. He only played in 50+ games in seven of those seasons. His collegiate resume is vastly more impressive. His NBA career was not quite as accomplished but he had a seven-year run worthy of making this list.

70). Kevin Johnson

KJ is the most underrated PG in NBA history in my opinion. He’s so underrated that I’m not sure he’ll even sniff the Basketball Hall of Fame. Over a four-year stretch from ’89-’92, he averaged 21 points and 11 assists per game. He is 6th on the all-time list for assists per game just a fraction of an assist (.13 to be exact) behind Isiah Thomas and Jason Kidd. He is also the only player in NBA history to average 20 points, 10 assists, 2 steals, while shooting over .500% from the field in a season. He was also selected to the Second Team All-NBA four times (three times behind Magic Johnson and once behind John Stockton).

71). Dennis Johnson

I didn’t get a full appreciation for DJ’s game until I watched the 1981 NBA All-Star game. Before that, I viewed him as the veteran DJ of “And…now there’s a steal by Bird, underneath to DJ who lays it in!” fame. Johnson was a perennial all-star and master of defense. He was selected First Team All-Defense six times. He was also selected First Team All-NBA and Second Team All-NBA once each. He was the 1979 NBA Finals MVP and finished in the top 10 of the MVP Voting twice.

72). Paul Pierce

Sometimes statistics and/or reputation don’t tell the whole story. Pierce has only been selected to the Third Team All-NBA twice. That might change this year but he doesn’t get the recognition he deserves. He is one of the most difficult players to defend in the NBA. He is a very good three-point shooter having eclipsed the 38% mark five times. He uses his large frame to get to the basket on just about anyone. And, he has a lethal mid-range game. By the time his career is over, I think Pierce will have been one of the 50 greatest players of all-time based on difficulty to defend. Whether that becomes a popular view remains to be seen. It’s not like his career numbers don’t impress. He has averaged 23 points, 6.5 rebounds, 4 assists and close to 2 steals a game for ten seasons.

73). Earl Monroe

There is no doubt that Monroe was a great player. I’m not as high on him as others. In 13 NBA seasons, he never finished in the top 10 of the MVP Voting and he was only selected to one All-NBA team. His career is so underwhelming statistic-wise that NBA Reference.com’s Hall of Fame Probability puts Monroe at 26.4%. Obviously there was more to Monroe’s game than honors and statistics because he is in the Hall of Fame. I just think his legacy–one that was larger than life before he ever entered the NBA–probably puts him a little bit higher than he should be on most lists.

74). Chris Mullin

Mullin was a tough player to rate. Clearly, he was very, very good. There isn’t a member of the original Dream Team that wouldn’t be classified as an all-time great. Still, I think I might have underrated him but I can’t be certain. He was selected to the First Team All-NBA once and Second Team All-NBA twice. Over a five-year stretch from ’89-’93, Mullin averaged 26 points, 5.5 rebounds, 4.5 assists and 2 steals while shooting .520 from the field. Mullin was also a very good three-point and free-throw shooter having led the league in both categories.

75). Ray Allen

Allen has the prettiest jump shot the league has ever seen. Seriously, if you ever want to know how you should be shooting the ball, just watch Ray Allen. He has an insane amount of elevation and a quick, fluid release. By the time he retires, he will likely be the most prolific three-point shooter in NBA history. I’m also pretty certain that he will go down as one of the most underrated players in NBA history. That might change if Boston wins an NBA Championship. Allen averaged at least 21 points per game for 10-straight seasons. He averages more points, rebounds, and assists than Reggie Miller did. He’s also a slightly better three-point shooter. Allen is also more athletic than Miller. Allen hasn’t gone the same amount of “pub” as Miller but there is no question in my mind that he has been the better player.

76). Dave Debusschere

Debusschere was a rebounding machine at 6’6. He averaged a double-double for 12 consecutive seasons. He was selected First Team All-Defense six times and made eight trips to the All-Star game. He had a pair of 11th place finishes in the NBA Voting. Although he had some decent scoring seasons, Debusschere wasn’t nearly as effective offensively. He only shot .430 from the field throughout his career and never averaged more than 19 points in a season.

77). Alonzo Mourning

‘Zo is one of the greatest defensive centers to play the game. He was named NBA Defensive Player of the Year two times. He is 11th all-time in blocks just five behind Robert Parish. He led the league in blocks per game and total blocks twice. He was also a very good offensive player having averaged 21 ppg over his first eight seasons. He finished in the top three of the MVP Voting twice including a second play finish in ’99 in which he narrowly lost to Karl Malone.

78). Reggie Miller

Reggie was a good player but he wasn’t nearly as good as his reputation makes him out to be. Miller was as one-dimensional as an NBA player gets. He only averaged three assists and three rebounds per game which is nowhere near ideal. He wasn’t a great defender. He wasn’t a good rebounder. He didn’t get a lot of assists. He never finished in the top 10 of the MVP Voting and never finished better than Third Team All-NBA. He was just an awesome three-point shooter. His Hall of Fame probability according to Basketball Reference.com is just a shade over 5%. Obviously, he is going to make the Hall of Fame but his numbers aren’t as impressive as some might expect.

79). Tim Hardaway

Hardaway had “skillz”. His career was very similar to Kevin Johnson’s only it was slightly less impressive. Hardaway did garner one First Team All-NBA selection (which is something KJ wasn’t able to do) and three Second Team All-NBA selections. Hardaway also finished in the top 10 of the MVP Voting three times. Hardaway was never a great shooter but he had a number of successful seasons. He averaged at least 18 points and 8 assists six times in his career. He is one of only a handful of players to average at least 21 points and 10 assists in a season twice.

80). Sam Jones

Jones was a vital cog in Boston’s 60s dominance. He was a part of 10-Championship teams in just 13 seasons including eight in a row from ’59-’66. During that run, Jones was the second best player on a loaded Celtics roster behind only Bill Russell. Bob Cousy was on the downside of his career and John Havlicek was just getting started. He was selected to the Second Team All-NBA three times and finished in the top 10 of the MVP Voting three times.

81). Vince Carter

Carter has the dubious distinction of being one of those players who never wins anything. Dominique Wilkins, Charles Barkley, and Tracy McGrady are other members of that club. To be fair, Carter has never been on a great team. If you put him on the 80s Lakers, there’s no doubt he would’ve won as many championships as James Worthy. Carter should take a hit for not being able to lead a team to serious contention but he should also be appropriately acknowledged for being a great player. Carter is 20th on the all-time list for PPG at 23.8. He takes a lot of shots but his shooting percentages aren’t that bad. He is a 45% shooter from the field and a 38% shooter from beyond the arc. Carter’s all-around game is certainly more evolved than someone like Reggie Miller. Carter has career averages of 5.5 rebounds and 4.2 assists per game to go along with a steal and a block. Carter’s career has been marred by injuries and untapped potential. Still, he is one of the most athletic players to ever play the game and is one of the top scorers the league has ever seen.

82). James Worthy

Worthy was a very good player. He was as important to the Lakers as Kevin McHale was to the Celtics. An argument could be made that Worthy’s place in history is overrated because he was fortunate enough to play with two of the top six players who ever played. However, I suppose it could also be argued that had Worthy been the go-to-guy on a different team, his numbers would be considerably higher. All I can judge him on is what he had to contend with and he was very Vince Carter-like. Like Carter, Worthy was never selected to a First Team All-NBA Team. Worthy never made a Second Team either. Carter has only managed that once. Like Carter, Worthy has never finished in the top 10 of the MVP Voting. Carter scored more points and grabbed more rebounds even though Worthy was a 6-9 PF. Carter’s PER (Player Efficiency Rating) is also substantially higher. Carter was the more talented player and probably the better player. Worthy has the brass and I’m sure he’s not complaining about that.

83). Marques Johnson

Johnson is one of the best players to not be in the Hall of Fame although he should be. Ironically, his middle name is Kevin. Marques Kevin Johnson and Kevin Johnson are the two best players who are not in the HOF, in my opinion. Maybe it’s the name? He was selected to a First Team All-NBA and two Second Teams. Fewer than 60 players in NBA history have averaged over 20 points for a career and Johnson is one of them. He also averaged seven rebounds and close to four assists. His PER is in the top 55 of all-time. He also finished in the top 10 of the MVP Voting twice.

84). Gail Goodrich

Goodrich was once on a Lakers team that also had Wilt Chamberlain, Elgin Baylor, and Jerry West. Granted, Baylor was pretty much done playing by that time but that was some star-power. Goodrich was the Sam Jones/Kevin McHale/James Worthy equivalent for the 70s Lakers. He wasn’t the best player on the team but he was very important in helping the Lakers win the ’72 Championship. He was the team’s leading scorer barely edging out West by .1 points. Goodrich never factored in the league MVP Voting but he did finish First Team All-NBA in ’74. He was a very good player but I’m not sure a sound argument can be made that he deserves to be in the HOF over Marques Johnson and Kevin Johnson.

85). David Thompson

If Dwyane Wade doesn’t start taking care of his body, he’ll end up right around here with David Thompson. I have Wade rated higher because his career isn’t close to being over. The way I choose to rate current players is to assume a consistently good–not great–level of production for the rest of their career. If Wade’s career ended today, he would plummet. Thompson was a force in the NBA for four seasons. He scored 73 points in the final game of the ’78 season. He was selected to the First Team All-NBA twice and finished in the top 10 of the MVP Voting three times. Unfortunately, injuries and substance abuse caused Thompson to be out of the league by the age of 29.

86). Paul Westphal

Westphal is a lot like Kevin Johnson in terms of being underrated. He isn’t in the Hall of Fame and I don’t think many people care. However, he had a very good stretch that culminated in being named to the First Team All-NBA three times and the Second Team All-NBA once. I would be surprised if there was another player in NBA history who has been selected First Team All-NBA three times who isn’t in the Basketball Hall of Fame. From 1976 to 1980, Westphal averaged 23 points, 5.5 assists, and 1.8 steals per game while shooting better than .520. Westphal was selected to the All-Star Game five times and finished 6th in the MVP Voting in 1978. Despite not being in the HOF, Westphal’s accolades are just as impressive of many players who are in the Hall of Fame.

87). Mitch Richmond

Richmond had an interesting career. I struggled to compare him to Reggie Miller. Richmond averaged more points, rebounds, and assists. He also was selected Second Team All-NBA three times. Miller never finished better than a Third Team All-NBA selection. Miller shot a better percentage but it was very close. Miller shot 47% from the field to Richmond’s 46%. Miller shot 40% from three-point range to Richmond’s 39%. The big difference is that Miller’s teams won and Richmond’s teams didn’t. By “winning”, I obviously mean had success in the regular season. Miller never won anything in the playoffs. So, Miller gets the nod. Still, Richmond had a Hall-of-Fame worthy career. He is 34th on the all-time points list and 37th on the all-time list for points per game. It’ll be interesting to see if he makes it to the HOF.

88). Max Zaslofsky

Zaslofsky goes way back to the days of George Mikan. He was selected to the First Team All-NBA four times. Max led the league in scoring in 1948. He also led the league in rebounds in ’47 and ’48. Although he never won an NBA Championship, he led his team to the NBA Finals four different times. Max is not in the Hall of Fame which is a little bit ridiculous.

89). George Yardley

Yardley was teammates with Zaslofsky for the last two seasons of Zaslofsky’s career. I gave the edge to Zaslofsky because he was selected to the First Team All-NBA four times while Yardley only garnered that honor once. Yardley led the NBA in scoring in 1958. He led his teams to two NBA Finals appearances but came up short both times. Yardley finished in the top four of the MVP Voting twice. The MVP Award wasn’t given out until Zaslofsky’s career had ended so there is no comparison available there.

90). Jack Twyman

Twyman was a scoring machine as he became the first player in NBA history to average more than 30 points per game in a season (Chamberlain was also the first as both did it in 1960). Twyman finished in the top ten of the MVP Voting four times. He was selected to the Second Team All-NBA twice and made six All-Star games.

91). Walt Bellamy

Bellamy is one of only seven players in NBA history to score more than 20,000 points and grab more than 14,000 rebounds (Robert Parish, Karl Malone, Elvin Hayes, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Moses Malone, and Wilt Chamberlain are the others). He finished in the top 10 in rebounding eight times, scoring five times, and field goal percentage 10 times. Some of Bellamy’s totals are just ridiculous. For instance, in 1962–his rookie season–he averaged 32 points and 19 rebounds per game. Despite his numbers, Bellamy was never selected to an All-NBA team and never finished in the top 10 of the MVP Voting. Part of that can be blamed on the fact that his contemporaries were Bill Russell, Wilt Chamberlain and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. The other part–I’m sure–can be attributed to the fact that Bellamy was taller than everyone else at 6’11 and had the luxury of putting up big-time stats on bad teams (his teams only won two playoff series in 14 years).

92). Bob Lanier

Lanier had a good but not spectacular career. He only played more than 70 games in seven of his 14 seasons which is why his career didn’t play out as promising as it started. From the age of 23-29, Lanier averaged 23 points and 13 rebounds per game. He finished in the top 10 of the MVP Voting three times and won the NBA All-Star Game MVP in ’74. However, he was never selected to an All-NBA team. Lanier’s PER was among the best in the league over his career. He finished in the top five for eight consecutive seasons.

93). George McGinnis

McGinnis was one of those “tweeners” who spent time in the ABA and the NBA. His NBA totals were decent. He averaged 17 points, 10 boards, four assists, and two steals. His first season in the NBA was brilliant as he averaged 23, points 13 boards, 5 assists, and 3 steals. McGinnis made three NBA All-Star games and was selected First Team All-NBA and Second Team All-NBA once each. He also finished 5th in the NBA MVP Voting in ’76. While those numbers and accolades aren’t overwhelming, it’s important to remember that McGinnis destroyed the ABA for the first four seasons of his career. He was the MVP of the ’73 ABA Playoffs and the MVP of the ABA in ’75. He also made three consecutive First Team All-ABA teams.

94). Joe Fulks

Fulks was one of the early greats at the forward position. He led his team to the NBA Championship in his rookie season. He also won two scoring titles. His career started the same season as Max Zaslofsky. I gave the slight edge to Zaslofsky for two very small reasons. 1). Zaslofsky was selected First Team All-NBA four times while Fulks was given that honor three times. 2). Zaslofsky took his team to four NBA Finals while Fulks did it twice. Other than that, these guys are fairly indistinguishable.

95). Gus Johnson

Before there was Gus Johnson, the fantastic play-by-play guy, there was Gus “Honeycomb” Johnson of basketball fame. The latter is 12th on the all-time list for rebounds per game at 12.68. He was renowned for having a complete game, offensively and defensively. He was a low-post wiz and a physical defender. He was selected Second Team All-NBA four times and First Team All-Defense twice. Johnson–along with Earl Monroe and Wes Unseld–led the Bullets to the ’71 NBA Finals where they were dispatched by Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Oscar Robertson’s Bucks.

96). Dan Issel

Issel was difficult to rate because virtually all of his honors were achieved in the ABA. He made six ABA All-Star teams and only one NBA All-Star team. He was selected First Team All-ABA once and Second Team All-ABA four times and never made an all-league team in the NBA. He led the ABA in scoring three consecutive seasons Still, in nine seasons in the NBA, Issel averaged 20 points and eight rebounds per game. He has the 40th best PER in NBA history. It’s clear from looking at both his success in the ABA and the NBA that Issel was, indeed, a very good player.

97). Tom Heinsohn

Heinsohn barely gets the edge over Vern Mikkelsen. Their careers are nearly identical except Heinsohn was a part of eight NBA Championship teams. I really don’t have much more to go on. Both made six All-Star teams and were both selected Second Team All-NBA four times.

98). Vern Mikkelsen

Mikkelsen was the power forward for the Lakers 50s dynasty that won five NBA Championships. Mikkelsen, George Mikan and Jim Pollard formed one of the greatest frontcourts in NBA history. Mikkelsen was selected Second Team All-NBA four times and played in the first six NBA All-Star games.

99). Dikembe Mutombo

I propose a trade. Everyone has to stop insinuating that Mutombo is older than he really is and, in return, Mutombo has to give up his stupid finger-taunt. I think that’s more than fair. Mutombo can’t stand the insinuations and I can’t stand the finger wave. Mutombo is probably one of the two or three greatest defensive centers in NBA history. He has won the Defensive Player of the Year four times. He has led the NBA in rebounds four times and blocks five times. Only Wilt Chamberlain and Moses Malone have led the NBA in rebounds more than Mutombo. No other player in NBA history has led the league in blocks more. Mutombo led the league in blocks for five consecutive seasons. Nobody other player has done it more than twice in a row. He has also led the NBA in offensive rebounds and defensive rebounds on separate occasions. Mutombo gets a lot of heat for his offensive game but he averaged a double-double in each of his first ten seasons and shot over .520 from the field.

100). Amare Stoudemire

Amare gets the edge over Carmelo for a number of reasons. Amare has finished in the top ten of the MVP voting twice including a sixth place finish in ’08. Carmelo has zero top-ten finishes. Amare has a First and Second Tea All-NBA selection. Carmelo has never faired better than a Third-Team selection. Amare has a better offensive and defensive rating. He has more win shares and his PER is much better. Amare will rate much higher in just a few years. He’s only 25 and missed an entire season due to a knee injury. Carmelo will probably be among the top 100 within a year or two.

Honorable mention (in no particular order): Brad Daugherty, Mel Daniels, Kevin Willis, Jo Jo White, Sydney Moncrief, Chauncey Billups, Mark Price, Slater Martin, Lou Dampier, Maurice Cheeks, Rich Guerin, Alvin Robertson, Fat Lever, World B. Free, Reggie Theus, Rolando Blackman, Geoff Petrie, Anfernee Hardaway, Kiki Vandeweghe, Carmelo Anthony, Dwight Howard, Ben Wallace, Yao Ming, Bobby Jones, Shawn Kemp, Jack Sikma, Bob Davies, Jim Pollard, Connie Hawkins, Rasheed Wallace, Shawn Marion, Walter Davis, Peja Stojakovic, Glen Rice, Lou Hudson, Jermaine O’Neal, Dennis Rodman, Cliff Hagan, Bob Love, Tom Chambers, Manu Ginobili and Chet Walker.

Top 100 Basketball Players of All-Time (list only)

1) Michael Jordan
2) Kareem Abdul-Jabbar
3) Magic Johnson
4) Shaquille O’Neal
5) Wilt Chamberlain
6) Bill Russell
7) Tim Duncan
8) Larry Bird
9) Oscar Robertson
10) Karl Malone
11) Kobe Bryant
12) Hakeem Olajuwon
13) Julius Erving
14) Moses Malone
15) David Robinson
16) Bob Pettit
17) Kevin Garnett
18) Charles Barkley
19) George Mikan
20) Jerry West
21) LeBron James
22) Bob Cousy
23) Elgin Baylor
24) Dolph Schayes
25) Rick Barry
26) George Gervin
27) Dirk Nowitzki
28) John Havlicek
29) John Stockton
30) Walt Frazier
31) Neil Johnston
32) Isiah Thomas
33) Steve Nash
34) Allen Iverson
35) Elvin Hayes
36) Bill Sharman
37) Scottie Pippen
38) Gary Payton
39) Jerry Lucas
40) Willis Reed
41) Tiny Archibald
42) Bob McAdoo
43) Dominique Wilkins
44) Clyde Drexler
45). Jason Kidd
46) Paul Arizin
47). Dave Cowens
48). Tracy McGrady
49) Patrick Ewing
50) Dwyane Wade
51). Billy Cunningham
52). Artis Gilmore
53). Chris Webber
54). Wes Unseld
55). Kevin McHale
56). Grant Hill
57) Nate Thurmond
58). Dave Bing
59). Lenny Wilkens
60). Robert Parish
61). Joe Dumars
62). Ed Macauley
63). Adrian Dantley
64). Bill Walton
65) Hal Greer
66). Spencer Haywood
67). Bernard King
68). Alex English
69) Pete Maravich
70). Kevin Johnson
71). Dennis Johnson
72). Paul Pierce
73). Earl Monroe
74). Chris Mullin
75). Ray Allen
76). Dave Debusschere
77). Alonzo Mourning
78). Reggie Miller
79). Tim Hardaway
80). Sam Jones
81). Vince Carter
82). James Worthy
83). Marques Johnson
84). Gail Goodrich
85). David Thompson
86). Paul Westphal
87). Mitch Richmond
88). Max Zaslofsky
89). George Yardley
90). Jack Twyman
91). Walt Bellamy
92). Bob Lanier
93). George McGinnis
94). Joe Fulks
95). Gus Johnson
96). Dan Issel
97). Tom Heinsohn
98). Vern Mikkelsen
99). Dikembe Mutombo
100). Amare Stoudemire

Famous Test cricket grounds

 

Feroz Shah Kotla

The Feroz Shah Kotla Ground or Feroz Shah Kotla Stadium was established as a cricket ground in 1883. It is the second oldest international cricket stadium still functional in India, only after the Eden Gardens in Kolkata. It is located close to the 20,000 capacity Ambedkar Stadium, the home of association football club New Delhi Heroes FC.

Most successful visiting team:- England – 3 wins, West Indies – 2 wins. Of only 6 games won by visiting teams, England have won 3 games here.

Highest Innings Score : 644/8 by West Indies on 6 February 1959 – India drew with West Indies.

Lowest Innings Score : 75 all out by India on 25 November 1987 – West Indies beat India by 5 wickets.

Wins Batting First : 5.

Wins Bowling Last : 12.

Average Innings Score : 288

Most Prolific Batsman : Dilip Vengsarkar (671 runs).

Highest Individual Score : 230* by Bert Sutcliffe v India on 16 December 1955 – India drew with New Zealand.

Most Successful Bowler : Anil Kumble (58 wickets).

List of famous test cricket grounds, sachin,dhoni,feroz shah kotla

Eden Gardens

Eden Gardens is a cricket ground in Kolkata, India. It is the home of the Bengal cricket team and the Indian Premier League’s Kolkata Knight Riders, as well as being a venue for Test, One Day International and Twenty20 International matches. The largest cricket stadium in India and second-largest in the world by seating capacity, it is widely acknowledged to be the most iconic cricket stadium in India. Eden Gardens has been called “cricket’s answer to the Colosseum”.

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In 1946, an in-form Mushtaq Ali was dropped from the Indian team selected to play an unofficial test against Australian Services XI. Following crowd protests (with slogans like “No Mushtaq, No Test”), the selectors brought him back to play.

Hosted the memorable World Cup final of 1987 which ended with Australia defeating England by 7 runs.

The 1996 World Cup semi-final was called off and Sri Lanka awarded the match after crowd disturbances following an Indian batting collapse. a.

During the 2nd final of the 1997 Pepsi Independence Cup, the Test and ODI captains of the Indian cricket team of all time (with a few notable exceptions) were given a lap of honour around the stadium.

In 1999, leading Indian batsman Sachin Tendulkar was run out after colliding with Pakistan’s Shoaib Akhtar. The crowd judged that Akhtar had impeded Tendulkar and rioted, forcing the police to evict the spectators. The match continued in front of an empty stadium.

Kapil Dev took an ODI hat-trick against the Sri Lankans in 1991 at the ground.

Harbhajan Singh took a hat-trick against Australia in 2000/01 at the ground. He became the first Indian to take a hat-trick in Test cricket.

VVS Laxman scored 281 against Australia in 2000/01. This remains the highest score at the ground. Australia were defeated despite holding the advantage for the majority of the game in “the greatest come-from-behind victory of modern times”. It was only the third time in Test history that a team had won after being forced to follow on.

The top four highest scores in this stadium has in Test cricket has been registered by India scoring 657-7 in 2001, 643-6 in 2010, 633-5 in 1998 and 631-7 in 2011.

The most runs here was scored by V.V.S. Laxman(1041 runs), followed by Mohammed Azharuddin(860 runs) and Rahul Dravid(843 runs). The most wickets taken here was by Harbhajan Singh(46 wickets) followed by [Anil Kumble](40 wickets) and [Bishen Singh Bedi](29 wickets).

The highest score in ODIs here was made by India, who scored 317-3 in 2009. The second highest score was made by Sri Lanka, who scored 315-6 in 2009, the third highest score was again made by Sri Lanka who were all-out for 309 in 1997.

The most runs scored here by a batsman was by Sachin Tendulkar (496 runs), followed by Mohammed Azharuddin (332 runs) and Aravinda de Silva (306 runs). The most wickets taken here was by Anil Kumble and Kapil Dev (14 wickets each), followed by Javagal Srinath (8 wickets) and Ajit Agarkar (7 wickets).

VVS Laxman and Mohd.Azharuddhin have scored 5 centuries each at this venue,the last being the unbeaten 176 by Laxman.

Queen’s Park Oval

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Queen’s Park Oval, in Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago, is currently the largest capacity cricket ground in the West Indies and has hosted more Test matches than any other ground in the Caribbean. It also hosted a number of matches in the 2007 Cricket World Cup.

It is privately owned by the Queen’s Park Cricket Club and has seating for about 25,000. The Trinidad and Tobago cricket team play most of their home matches at the ground. The cricket field has also been used to host several domestic and international football matches.

In February 2010 American Singer-songwriter Beyonce Knowles was supposed to be performing at the Oval to a sold out show, however due to phenomenal demand for tickets the venue was changed to the Queen’s Park Savannah.

Besides the main cricket stadium, the facility includes a Gym, indoor and outdoor cricket practice nets, two squash courts and two outdoor tennis courts.

The ground is considered one of the most picturesque venues in the world of cricket, featuring the view Trinidad’s Northern Range.

Sahara Park Newlands

Newlands Cricket Ground in Cape Town is a South African cricket ground. It’s the home of the Cape Cobras, who play in the SuperSport Series, MTN Domestic Championship and Standard Bank Pro20 competitions. It is also a venue for Test matches.

Newlands is regarded as one of the most beautiful cricket grounds in the world, being overlooked by Table Mountain and Devil’s Peak. It is close to Newlands Stadium, which is a rugby union and football venue.

The ground hosted its first Test match in March 1889 when England defeated South Africa by an innings and 202 runs. As of January 2011, there have been 46 Test matches played at the ground of which South Africa has won 17, their opponents 19 and 10 which ended in a draw. The last team besides Australia to beat South Africa there was New Zealand, in 1961 .

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The first One Day International played at the ground was in December 1992 when South Africa beat India by 6 wickets. As of January 2011, there have been 35 One-day Internationals played at the ground including five in the 2003 Cricket World Cup. South Africa has won 25 of its games there and lost 4 (India being the most recent opposition victor in 2011).

Between 1991 and 1997 numerous changes were made to the ground. Large portions of the grass embankments were replaced by pavilions increasing the seating capacity to 25,000.
Newlands is one of the few cricket grounds in South Africa that tends to favour spinners. Most grounds tend to favour pacemen or batsmen, but the Western Cape has had a history of having very good spinners, a recent example being Paul Adams.

The Adelaide Oval

The Adelaide Oval is a sports ground in Adelaide, South Australia, located in the parklands between the city centre and North Adelaide. In the 21st Century it has been home to the cricket teams, the South Australian Redbacks and the Adelaide Strikers. It has been home to the South

Australian Cricket Association (SACA) since 1871.
The oval has a rich history which dates back to 1871, shortly after the formation of the SACA, and is considered to be “one of the most picturesque Test cricket grounds in Australia, if not the world.”

The ground is mostly used for cricket and Australian rules football, but plays host to other sports such as Rugby League and Soccer, and is also used as an entertainment venue for performances expecting large attendance.

The oval is managed by the South Australian Cricket Association (SACA). In 2006, it had a seating capacity of 36,000. The maximum crowd at a cricket game was 50,962 during the Bodyline test in 1932, and the maximum crowd was 62,543, set at the 1965 SANFL Grand Final between the Port Adelaide and Sturt Football Clubs.

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Major sporting events at Oval:

1. International cricket
2. Domestic cricket
3. Australian rules football
4. Rugby sevens
5. Rugby league.

Old Trafford Cricket Ground

Old Trafford is a cricket ground in Old Trafford, Greater Manchester. It has been the home of Lancashire County Cricket Club since it was formed in 1864, having been the ground of Manchester Cricket Club from 1857. Test matches have been played there since 1884.

The two ends of the ground are the Pavilion End to the north and the Brian Statham End to the south, renamed in honour of the former Lancashire and England player. A section of Warwick Road to the east is also called Brian Statham Way. Immediately abutting the ground to the south-east is the Old Trafford Metrolink station.

Before Cardiff hosted its first Test match in July 2009, Old Trafford was reputedly the wettest Test ground in the country; this is because Manchester, situated west of the Pennines, receives weather brought in from the Atlantic by the prevailing westerly breezes. Old Trafford is the only ground in England where a Test match has been abandoned without a ball being bowled – and this has happened here twice. These prevailing conditions have encouraged Lancashire to keep the ground as well-drained as possible, most recently through the acquisition of a Hover Cover in 2007, and the installation of new drains towards the end of the 2008 season.

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Notable moments at Old Trafford

1902 – The Australian Victor Trumper hit a hundred before lunch on the first day;Australia went on to win the Test by 3 runs – the third closest Test result in history.

1909 – Frank Laver, the Australian player/manager, took 8–31 in a drawn Test.

1930–1948 – Donald Bradman played three Tests at Old Trafford, scoring just 81 runs at 27.00 – his innings being 14 (1930), 30 (1934) and 7 and 30* (1948). He told Bill Frindall that the light was always so bad that he couldn’t see the ball.

1938 – The second rained-off Test. In a desperate effort to ensure play, the groundstaff moved the turf from the practice pitch to the square – a unique attempt.

1956 – Jim Laker became the first person to take all 10 wickets in a Test match innings, achieving figures of 10 for 53 in the fourth Test against Australia (the only other bowler to take all 10 wickets in an innings is Anil Kumble of India in 1999). Having also taken 9 for 37 in the first innings, Laker ended the match with record figures of 19 for 90, which remain unmatched to this day.

1961 – With England firmly in control going into the fourth day, Richie Benaud took 6–70 to win Australia the game. The great Lancashire and England player Brian Statham also took his only Test ‘five for’ on his home ground.

1963 – On 1 May, the first ever one day cricket match took place at Old Trafford, as the Gillette Cup was launched. Lancashire beat Leicestershire in a preliminary knock-out game, as 16th and 17th finishers in the Championship the previous year, to decide who would fill the 16th spot in the one-day competition.

1971 – The Gillette Cup semi-final between Lancashire and Gloucestershire was played in near-darkness. With the time approaching 8.45 pm on July 28 and 25 runs still needed from the five remaining overs, David Hughes hit 24 off a single over and set up a notable Lancashire victory.

1981 – Ian Botham hit 118, including six sixes (the second greatest number in an Ashes innings), which he has called “one of the three innings I would like to tell my grandchildren about”.

1984 – Sir Vivian Richards scored his notable 189 not out for the West Indies in the first one-day international for the Texaco Trophy against England. Batting at number four, Richards had made 95 when he was joined by the last batsman Michael Holding with the West Indies in a parlous position at 166 for 9. Together they added 106 runs for the final wicket. Richards hammered 21 fours and 5 sixes. The West Indies won the match convincingly by 104 runs.

1990 – Sachin Tendulkar scored his first Test hundred at the age of 17 – becoming the second youngest centurion – to help India draw.

1993 – Shane Warne’s “Ball of the Century” to Mike Gatting. In the same game, Graham Gooch was out handled the ball for 133 – only the fifth out of seven times this has ever happened.

2000 – Michael Atherton and Alec Stewart played their hundredth Tests, against the West Indies.

2005 – The third Test of the Ashes series ended in a nailbiting draw, with thousands of fans shut out of the ground on the final day as tickets were sold out.

2010–11 – The wickets were relaid, changing their extremely unusual East-West axis to a more conventional North-South layout. The Brian Statham End to the East, and Stretford End to the West, were replaced by the Pavilion End to the North, and the Brian Statham End to the South.

The Sydney Cricket Ground

The Sydney Cricket Ground (SCG) is a sports stadium in Sydney in Australia. It is used for Australian football, Test cricket, One Day International cricket, some rugby league football and rugby union matches and is the home ground for the New South Wales Blues cricket team and the Sydney Swans of the Australian Football League. It is owned and operated by the SCG Trust that also manages the Sydney Football Stadium located next door.

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Seating Capacity: 46,000

Largest rugby league match attendance: 78,056 (St George v South Sydney, 18 September 1965)

Largest cricket match attendance: 58,446 (Australia v England, 15 December 1928)

Largest soccer match attendance: 51,566 (NSW v Everton, 2 May 1964)

Largest rugby union match attendance: 49,327 (NSW v New Zealand, 13 July 1907)

Largest Australian rules football match attendance: 46,168 (Sydney v Geelong, 30 August 1997)

Largest concert attendance: 45,191 (WaveAid benefit concert, 29 January 2005)

The Oval Cricket Ground

The Oval, referred to as the Kia Oval due to a commercial sponsorship deal, is an international cricket ground in Kennington, in the London Borough of Lambeth. In the past it was also sometimes called the Kennington Oval. In past years it was officially named as the ‘Fosters Oval’, ‘AMP Oval’, ‘Brit Insurance Oval’, due to previous commercial sponsorship deals.
The Oval is the home ground of Surrey County Cricket Club, and also traditionally hosts the final Test match of each English summer season in late August or early September. The Oval was the first ground in the United Kingdom and second in the world (after the Melbourne Cricket Ground) to host Test cricket.
The names of the ends are the Pavilion End and the Vauxhall End.

In 1868, 20,000 spectators gathered at the Oval for the first game of the 1868 Aboriginal cricket tour of England, the first tour of England by any foreign side.

The first One Day International match at this venue was played on 7 September 1973 between England and West Indies. It had the privilege of hosting matches of the 1975, 1979, 1983 and 1999 World Cups. It also hosted five of the fifteen matches in the 2004 ICC Champions Trophy, including the final. No floodlit day/night international match has been played here to date, although Surrey have played several floodlit one-day matches. In fact, Surrey’s ground is noted as having the first floodlights at a sport arena in the form of gas-lamps dating back to 1889.

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The Melbourne Cricket Ground

The Melbourne Cricket Ground (MCG) is an Australian sports stadium located in Yarra Park, Melbourne and is home to the Melbourne Cricket Club. It is the tenth largest stadium in the world, the largest in Australia, the largest stadium for playing cricket, and holds the world record for the highest light towers at any sporting venue. The MCG is within walking distance of the city centre and is serviced by the Richmond railway station, Richmond and the Jolimont railway station, East Melbourne. It is part of the Melbourne Sports and Entertainment Precinct.

Internationally, the MCG is remembered as the centrepiece stadium of both the 1956 Summer Olympics and the 2006 Commonwealth Games. The open-air stadium is also one of the world’s most famous cricket venues, with the well-attended Boxing Day Test match commencing on Boxing Day (26 December) each year. Throughout the winter, it serves as the home of Australian rules football, with at least one game (though usually more) held there each round. The stadium fills to capacity for the AFL Grand Final in late September, or early October.

The MCG was the home of Australia’s first full colour video scoreboard, which replaced the old scoreboard in 1982. In 1985, light towers were installed at the ground, allowing for night football and day-night cricket games.

From 2011 until 2013, the Victorian Government and the Melbourne Cricket Club will fund a $55 million refurbishment of the facilities of Great Southern Stand, including renovations to entrance gates and ticket outlets, food and beverage outlets, public concourses, toilets, function rooms, etc.; the grandstand itself will not be substantially modified as part of the refurbishment.

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An incident in the second Test of the 1960–61 series involved the West Indies player Joe Solomon being given out after his hat fell on the stumps after being bowled at by Richie Benaud. The crowd sided with the West Indies over the Australians.

The MCG hosted the historic 1992 Cricket World Cup final between Pakistan and England with a crowd of more than 87,000. Pakistan won the match after sterling all-round performance by Wasim Akram who scored 33 runs and picked up 3 crucial wickets to make Pakistan cricket world champions for the first and as of yet only time. The match was also Imran Khan’s last match after which he retired.

During the 1995 Boxing Day Test at the MCG, Australian umpire Darrell Hair called Sri Lankan spin bowler Muttiah Muralitharan for throwing the ball, rather than bowling it, seven times during the match. The other umpires did not call him once and this caused a controversy, although he was later called for throwing by other umpires seven other times in different matches.

The Lords

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Lord’s Cricket Ground (generally known as Lord’s) is a cricket venue in St John’s Wood, London. Named after its founder, Thomas Lord, it is owned by Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC) and is the home of Middlesex County Cricket Club, the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB), the European Cricket Council (ECC) and, until August 2005, the International Cricket Council (ICC). Lord’s is widely referred to as the “home of cricket” and is home to the world’s oldest sporting museum.

Lord’s today is not on its original site, being the third of three grounds that Lord established between 1787 and 1814. His first ground, now referred to as Lord’s Old Ground, was where Dorset Square now stands. His second ground, Lord’s Middle Ground, was used from 1811 to 1813 before being abandoned to make way for the construction through its outfield of the Regent’s Canal. The present Lord’s ground is about 250 yards (230 m) north-west of the site of the Middle Ground. A major redevelopment has been proposed for Lord’s which would increase capacity by another 10,000 as well as adding apartments and an ice rink.

Stands :

The Pavilion
Warner Stand
Grand Stand
Compton Stand
Media Centre
Edrich Stand
Mound Stand
Tavern Stand

Most career runs : Graham Gooch – 2015 runs in 39 innings

Highest individual score : 333 scored by Graham Gooch vs India in 1990

Most centuries : Graham Gooch – 6 in 39 innings

Top Ten Male Tennis Players without Career Grand Slam

 

You can find some legends in the history of tennis. The names are big enough to attract you in this popular sport. However, some of them are not so lucky even though they have hardly left anything to achieve in tennis. Today I have searched in internet to find out some of those unlucky legends of world tennis who could not win all the grand slam titles in their career. I became astonished that the list does not seem so short. In open era, only Roy Emerson could win all the grand slam titles in his career in men’s singles. Out of ten six players could not win any singles tournament in French Open.

Pete Sampras
Pete Sampras is regarded as the greatest male tennis players in the history of tennis. Sampras won 14 Grand Slam titles in his career which is still a record in the history of Men’s tennis. However, unfortunately Pete Sampras even could not reach at the final of the French Open. In 1996, he could reach at the semi-final of the French Open which is the best ever performance of Sampras in French Open. What made me surprised is that Sampras was world no.1 in the ATP ranking for record 286 weeks but could not even win a single title in French Open. Moreover, he is the only player in the Male tennis history who could finish six consecutive years as no.1 in the ranking. Speedy serve specially the quick second serve was the best weapons of Pete Sampras. However, in producing ‘aces’ and ‘running forehand’, he is considered as the best ever players in the history of Men’s tennis.

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Roger Federer
Roger Federer is another great tennis player who also has not won any French Open titles in his glorious career. Federer got into professional tennis in 1998 and till date he has already won 10 Grand Slam titles except the French Open. Roger Federer played in the final of French Open twice but lost to Rafael Nadal in both times. This current world no. 1 has never lost in any Grand Slam tournament finals except these two in French Open. He is skilled in different tennis shots especially in ground stroke from both sides. It is a bit hard to guess if Federer can win his most desired French Open title in his career to be out of this list.


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Jimmy Connors
French Open has been left to win by another tennis great Jimmy Connors. Winning 8 Grand Slam tournaments he has become a part of the tennis history. Jimmy Connors reached at the semi-final of the French Open for four times but could not make it to the final even in his successful career. This American won five US Open tournaments in his career and became one of the most successful male tennis players in US Open history. Statistics can not depict the greatness of Jimmy Connors. For your convenience, I like to inform you that some of the tennis greats were his contemporaries including Björn Borg. John McEnroe, Arthur Ashe ect.

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Ivan Lendl
The disappointment for Ivan Lendl, another tennis great, came to Wimbledon. He has also won 8 Grand Slam in his career except Wimbledon. He played in the final of French Open twice but could not lift the trophy. This Czech tennis star was one of the best tennis players of 1980s. Ivan Lendl could finish four years as world no. 1 and remain no.1 for 270 weeks which was a record at that time. There was hardly anything left that Ivan could not win except Wimbledon. To me, it is really a big disappointment for a great player but it does not mean that it can decrease the greatness of a great player.

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Mats Wilander
This great Swedish tennis player could never win even a single title in Wimbledon in his successful playing career. His performance in Wimbledon does not go with his overall career success with Seven Grand Slam titles. Compared to his performance in other Grand Slam tournaments, Mats Wilander’s performance in Wimbledon is very ordinary. Mats Wilander even could never reach at the semi-final of Wimbledon. However, he is still regarded as one of the finest tennis player in the history of tennis. He has been inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame in 2002. Mats Wilander was famous for his strong competitive approach.

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Bjorn Borg
Sometimes fate can play with you and you can not find anything to win against it. The same thing happened to Bjorn Borg, one of the most respected characters in the history of Tennis. He won 11 Grand Slam titles in his career but he could never lift trophy in Australian Open and US Open. Bjorn Borg was born in Sweden and being fascinated by a golden racquet of his father, Borg started playing tennis. Later on, this former world no. 1 achieved a golden career in international arena with 11 Grand Slam tournaments. Only Pete Sampras (14) and Roy Emerson (12) are ahead of Bjorn Borg in terms of Grand Slam titles. Bjorn Borg played four finals in US Open consecutively. However, in Australian Open, he could show a very ordinary performance.

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John McEnroe
John McEnroe is one of the greatest figures in Men’s tennis. He dominated in 1980s in world tennis and could win seven Grand Slam tournaments He has won four US Open and three Wimbledon tournaments in his career. However, he could not win any single title in French Open and Australian Open. John McEnroe reached the final of the French Open in 1984 but lost to Ivan Lendl and in Australian Open; his best performance was reaching to semi-final. This German born American tennis legend had a huge dominance in his time over the world tennis.

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Boris Becker
This German born tennis player is also considered as one of the greatest entertainer of this game of sport. Boris Becker has won 6 Grand Slam tournaments including three Wimbledon titles two Australian Open titles and one US Open titles. However, he could not get anything from French Open despite reaching at the semi-finals for three occasions. Becker won gold medal in Olympic. He became professional tennis player in 1984. At 17, he won his first Grand Slam tournament in Wimbledon which was a record at that time. Boris Becker was very famous among the fans of his time.

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Stefan Edberg
Stefan Edberg is another unlucky tennis great who could not win French Open in his career. This former world no.1 won 6 Grand Slam tournaments in his glorious career. He won the other three Grand Slam tournaments twice in his career. He was born in Sweden and came to the lime light while playing in junior level. Stefan Edberg became profession in 1983 and before that he won Junior Grand Slam. So, form the very beginning of his career he was always under the lime light. In August 1990, he became the world no.1 in ATP ranking. Serve and volley are the two top most weapons of Stefan Edberg.

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Arthur Robert Ashe, Jr.
Arthur Ashe is one of the most famous African American in the history. When he won the 1968 US Open, he became the first African American to achieve such feat. In his career, he won three Grand Slam tournaments. He won US Open, Wimbledon and Australian Open once in his career but he could not lift the French Open title. He reached at the quarter final round of the French Open twice. Arthur Ashe had a great popularity as a social worker. He worked for different social issues like racism, AIDS etc. It is noteworthy that Ashe himself was died of AIDS. He was a great player as well as a great social worker.

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